Progesterone reduced my supraventricular tachycardia

by Susan Romanyk
(Santa Barbara, CA)

I am 53, and post menopausal for about 3 years now. I used progesterone cream during the transition into menopause, and it effectively eliminated all hot flashes, and I had no other symptoms associated with menopause during use. After about one and a half years after the transition, I stopped using it because I felt like my extreme symptoms were over. I did experience over-heating, whereby by my body temperature would go up uncomfortably, and stay there for hours. At this time also, I was experiencing tachycardia episodes about 2 times a month, for about a minute each, which is normal for me. This past January, I experienced my first tachycardia episode that lasted 30 minutes, and then in February, I had to go to the emergency room for one that lasted almost 2 hours. I researched natural therapies, and found that magnesium has a positive effect on tachycardia. But then, I developed "pinprick" sensations all over my body, which could have been caused by too much magnesium and lack of calcium. I have also read that pinpricks are a cardic effect of menopause. My doctor suggested that the pinpricks were due to menopause. I decided to try progesterone cream again (on my own), and AMAZINGLY, not only did the pinprick sensations subside, but my tachycardia has been dramatically reduced, to only one 5-15 second episode a month. I have read in some studies that progesterone has an enhancing effect on GABA, which is an inhibitory neurotransmitter, and can produce a calming effect on the nervous system. I have had many other benefits of progesterone cream. I only wish I could find a medical practitioner who could monitor and advise me in my treatment, in my local area.

Comments for Progesterone reduced my supraventricular tachycardia

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Oct 19, 2007
Tachycardia
by: Wray

Hi Susan You are right about GABA. Progesterone activates the GABA receptor sites, and as GABA is our major calming neurotransmitter, the overall affect is calming.

There are dozens of studies done on progesterone, in many diverse fields, but I have yet to find one done directly on tachycardia. I suggest you get in touch with Dr Platt in California. He's an authority on progesterone and has just written an excellent book called ?The Miracle of Bio-Indentical Hormones? which you might like to get. Take care Wray

http://www.drplatt.com/index.htm

Address:
73-345 Highway 111 , Suite 203
Palm Desert, CA 92260
phone | 760.836.3232
fax  | 760.836.3234

Jan 12, 2009
Racing heart
by: sherry

I am 53 and also have the racing heart, from menopause. I am trying progesterone and I hope it helps. I just don't know how long you can stay on it for, and be safe still. Do you know, has this helped anyone on here? I am in Toronto.

Sep 19, 2009
Pin Pricks
by: Anonymous

I am 54 and in menopause (or post menopause) I have no idea how to tell. Anyway, I get terrible hot flashes, and each time one comes on I get those pin pricks all over me! It's awful. Glad to know I am not alone. I'm not taking anything at this point, just thought eventually it's going to go away. Am I crazy?

Sep 20, 2009
Pin Pricks
by: Wray

The only way you can be sure you're in menopause are your periods. Do you have any? If not then you are in menopause. If you'd like more info please have a look at these web pages:

Peri-menopause
Menopause

If the hot flushes and pin pricks become unbearable, please consider using progesterone. Once they've started as yours have, a dose of about 200mg/day is needed to get them under control. Thereafter reduce the amount till the optimum is reached. Take care.

Oct 11, 2009
Any ideas for superventricular tachycardia
by: Terri

I am 55 and am still having my periods regularly. About eight years ago I started having "superventricular tachycardia" espisodes, or a fast heartbeat, which occurs about every two months and lasts for up to eight hours at a time.

I get extremely tired, hot, and nauseous and feel incredibly lousy until it stops and then I feel great again. I am convinced this is a menopausal symptom, but no one seems to know what causes the problem and I do not want to treat symptoms unless I simply cannot stand it any more. I am a very high energy person and this saps my energy like nothing else can. The longer it lasts the more concerned I become because this cannot be a good thing. I was told to try shocking my system by drinking ice cold water and that works some of the time. I tried drinking some magnesium in hot water, but that does not seem to help. I might try progesterone, but would love to hear of anything else that might help.

Oct 25, 2009
Any ideas for superventricular tachycardia
by: Wray

Hi Terri. The progesterone certainly helped Susan with her tachycardia, so it's certainly worth a try. But I believe you're short of taurine, it's vital for the heart and the most abundant amino acid in the heart. In fact it surpasses all the other aminos added together. It calms a racing heart, facilitates the entry of calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium into all cells and calms the brain too. It's one of the major neurotransmitters in the brain. I would suggest you try some, anything from 1000-5000mg/day, start low and work up till you find the optimum dose. Take care, Wray

Nov 05, 2009
Clarification on my previous entry re SVT
by: Susan Romanyk

Just wanted to clarify for all readers that my Supraventricular Tachycardia (SVT) is a condition that I have had all of my adult life, it did not begin with menopause. The occurrences of my SVT greatly increased after menopause, and then resumed to what was usual for me prior to menopause, after using progesterone cream. I am not sure if the references to racing heart rate or palpitations that others are stating is the same thing. I have used Taurine, but did not get significant results from it. I have recently discovered that Pycnogenol (an antioxidant) is also beneficial in reducing my SVT episodes.

Mar 11, 2012
treating tachycardia naturally
by: Anonymous

you might be interested in these articles

here, here, here and here.


Mar 12, 2012
Perimenopausal palpitations
by: Anonymous

I suffer from very severe palpitations, at ovulation and periodically until menses. I am desperate tot find an answer - can anyone give me any suggestions. I have tried magnesium and potassium supplements with no relief. I have also had a full cardiology check but am told they are benign PVCs. They may be benign but they are super scary and are really limiting my life now.

Mar 13, 2012
treating tachycardia naturally
by: Wray

Hi there Many thanks for the links, which I've coded, to make them live for easy access. I see they mention taurine, which is what I suggested to Terri she try. Although Susan says it didn't help hers, but doesn't give how much she took. Often the recommended amount is too low to have any effect. The last link is excellent, I've saved it for future reference. Funnily enough they don't mention a long QT interval as one cause of arrhythmia. I'm going to give the info to the anon query below, so won't repeat it here. Take care Wray

Mar 13, 2012
Perimenopausal palpitations
by: Wray

Hi there The links given above are all good, please look through them. Taurine is excellent, as there's more in the heart than any other tissues. Followed by the eyes and liver. Oxidative stress is very high in these tissues, taurine is a potent antioxidant. It's the most important osmolyte in the body, controlling the flow of electrolytes in and out of all cells. If there is a lack of taurine, no amount of calcium, magnesium, potassium or sodium will help. Please note taurine is only found in animal protein, not in vegetables, fruits, nuts or seeds at all. It can be converted from cysteine, but many authorities believe not in sufficient quantities, see here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here. I suggest you try 2000mg/day, starting off with 250mg and building up. Your palpitations might be benign to the doctor, but not to you. And I don't believe they are benign either. This is not to scare you, as there is a solution, but to do something as your doctor is obviously not interested. The clue to your problem is when you get them, this is so helpful for me. Oestrogen rises sharply just before ovulation, progesterone should too. There's normally a pre-ovulatory surge from the brain, see here, here, here and here. Continued below.

Mar 13, 2012
Perimenopausal palpitations Part 2
by: Wray

Hi there Oestrogen then drops slightly, to rise again mid-luteal phase. We do have a Graph which shows the rise and fall of the hormones. Although not the initial surge of progesterone, it needs to be altered! Progesterone should continue rising till the mid-luteal phase, hover there for a few days, then it drops sharply, along with oestrogen. Many adverse symptoms occur in many women during the pre-ovulatory surge of oestrogen, and during the luteal phase. Migraines, seizures, palpitations, hot flushes, to name some. All the studies show they are due to excess oestrogen, low progesterone. It appears you are not getting the pre-ovulatory surge of progesterone or the continual rise after it. I was about to ask you if you are in Peri-menopause, when I noticed your subject line. So your palpitations don't surprise me. Anovulatory cycles begin round about age 35, and continue in frequency till Menopause when we stop making viable eggs. No ovulation means of course no pre-ovulatory rise or continued rise of progesterone. In the months when ovulation takes place sometimes the corpus luteum makes insufficient progesterone to counter the rise in oestrogen, known as a defective luteal phase, see here. If the ratio of the two hormones becomes skewed all hell can break loose. We've found from Saliva Tests we run, that the ratio of P:E2 should be 600:1 and over to feel well. Has anyone checked your hormone levels? The reason for the palpitations is excess oestrogen. Oestrogen causes prolongation of the QT interval, which results in palpitations, arrhythmia and Torsades de Pointes. Whereas progesterone shortens the QT interval, see here, here, here, here, here and here. Continued below.

Mar 13, 2012
Perimenopausal palpitations Part 3
by: Wray

Hi there Although I normally suggest 100-200mg/day, I've found in the more severe symptoms such as migraines, asthma or seizures it's essential to use about 400-500mg/day. This usually prevents the Oestrogen Dominance effect. Initially progesterone stimulates oestrogen, particularly if a small amount is used, therefore symptoms become worse. Using the very high amounts normally prevents this. Some women find they do need more, it is trial and error, using symptoms as a guide. Please have a vitamin D test done, it's also vital for the heart, in fact for every cell. Most of us have low levels. A lack of vitamin D reduces the benefits of progesterone, and many women have found their symptoms resolve when getting their vitamin D levels up high. And that's in spite of using very high amounts of progesterone, see this comment here. For more info on vitamin D levels, testing etc see the Vitamin D Council, GrassrootsHealth, Birmingham Hospital and Vitamin D Links websites. Blood levels should be 70-100ng/ml or 175-250nmol/L and not the 30ng/ml or 75nmol/L most labs and doctors regard as adequate. The minimum daily dose should be 5000iu's per day, although the latest research indicates it should be 10,000iu's per day, see here. Take care Wray

Mar 13, 2012
Re: Perimenopausal palpitations
by: Anonymous

dear Wray,
You cannot believe the relief I felt at reading your comments. You explain it so well. The cardiologist I saw does not believe there is a link between palps and hormones but it seemed so obvious there must be a connection of somekind to me. Thank you. My doctor over here did do some blood tests 18 months ago which showed raised FSH she said, but will not do more blood tests, saliva testing or Vit D testing. I am already taking a Vit D supplement as I had read elsewhere about this, but taking a lower dose so will increase this. Can I clarify a couple of things please? Should the Taurine be taken as a single dose or a divided dose? Also how will I know when to stop the progesterone? And finally do you know of anywhere in the Uk where I can buy the progesterone or be prescribed it? My Gp in the past had mentioned Utrogestan tablets but then ended up giving me patches to try which only made me worse - now I know why! Thank you so much for giving me such a quick diagnosis - it already makes this whole thing more bearable just to understand. Many thanks.

Mar 13, 2012
Re:perimenopausal palpitations
by: Anonymous

Just found that you can ship to me! Great. Sorry I didn't see that before.

Mar 14, 2012
Re: Perimenopausal palpitations
by: Wray

Hi there So pleased the info helped you, it all makes so much sense to me. So many women get these palps, at the precise time you do, and yet they are given drugs for it. I didn't realise you lived in the UK, please have that vitamin D test done. It's so low in almost all living there, the worst hit being Scotland. Birmingham Hospital send out test kits for £20, and the result comes back 3 days after they receive the sample. Ignore their 'adequate' level, based on the NHS standard, it's far too low. Synthetic oestrogen/progestin would have made you feel worse! Yes we do ship to the UK, but I'm not concerned about people feeling they should use our cream, there are many on the market, the choice is their's, but thanks so much for trying it. We do have a distributor in the UK, if you wish to chat to someone, she also supplies vitamin D and taurine too. Her contact details are on her website here. I normally take the taurine as a single dose in the morning. Helps calm me down after too much coffee! And when to stop the progesterone is a difficult question! I for one will never stop, it's wonderful for the skin and ageing too, see here, here, here, here and here. It's up to the individual and their symptoms, once they've gone it can be reduced very slowly. I suggest about 16mg (1/2ml) each reduction, staying on that a few days before reducing again. This will prevent any adverse symptoms appearing again. Take care Wray


Apr 13, 2012
Re:perimenopausal palpitations
by: Anonymous

Wray I have the cream now! But realised I should have checked with you when I should use it - as my symptoms are severe should I use it every day initially or only from day 12 which is when I get the first bad bout of palpitations in the month. And as my cycles are so erratic - 36day/ 43 days/ 32 days anything up to 76 days once, do I still only use it for 14 days or longer. Here's hoping I soon get some relief! Many thanks for all your hel p -you really are a life saver!

Apr 16, 2012
Re:perimenopausal palpitations
by: Wray

Hi there Please use the progesterone daily, your cycles are impossible to follow now. This often happens in peri-menopause, it did with me too. Bleeding will come and go at will, just ignore it. You'll find cycles become longer until you hit menopause when of course they stop. I would hope after 2-3 months that you can begin to reduce the amount, very slowly of course. Just keep an eye open for any adverse symptoms, increasing if they should occur. It is trial and error. You might find encouragement from these comments here. Although a different story as it's about heavy bleeding, it'll give you some idea of how a drop in progesterone affects things. And please don't forget to have a vitamin D test done, and to possibly consider taking the taurine too. Please let me know how you get on, as I learn so much from other peoples experiences. Take care Wray

May 19, 2012
Taurine suggested by Wray
by: Susan Romanyk

Hello, Wray, I recently read your advice about Taurine, and have started taking it. I am also on a beta blocker (25 mg Lopressor/day) because of two major episodes of Tachycardia at airports. As I get older, I seem to need more help with it. The Taurine seems to be having a good effect, I was not taking enough before. Thank you for your suggestion. I am still using progesterone, and all menopausal symptoms are still non-existent.

May 21, 2012
Taurine suggested by Wray
by: Wray

Hi Susan I'm delighted the taurine has helped you, I take it daily as it's so calming, plus a potent antioxidant. I'm not sure how much progesterone you're using, evidently enough for the menopausal symptoms. But is it enough for the tachycardia? I don't know if you read the papers I gave above on the QT interval, so I'll give them to you. Oestrogen causes prolongation of the QT interval, which results in palpitations, arrhythmia and Torsades de Pointes. Whereas progesterone shortens the QT interval, see here, here, here, here, here, here and here. It could be because you're getting older you do need to use more. We still make oestrogen in our fat cells, oestrone the menopausal oestrogen, but no compensatory progesterone. Progesterone also acts as a 'beta blocker' by reducing the stress response and therefore the production of the stress hormones. Plus if enough is used it suppresses them. Beta blockers also decrease the production of renin, the renin-angiotensin system kicks in if vitamin D is low. Please consider having a vitamin D test done, it's so vital for the heart, see here, here, here and here. Plus this video Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention - David C Sane, M.D. Continued below.

May 21, 2012
Taurine suggested by Wray Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Susan For more info on vitamin D levels, test kits etc see the Vitamin D Council, GrassrootsHealth, Birmingham Hospital and Vitamin D Links websites. Blood levels should be 70-100ng/ml or 175-250nmol/L and not the 30ng/ml or 75nmol/L most labs and doctors regard as adequate. The minimum daily dose should be 5000iu's per day, although the latest research indicates it should be 10,000iu's per day, see here. I'm also so delighted you're still taking an interest in the site. I find it of such help when I get feedback from people, and you made your first comment over 4 years ago. Bless you! Take care Wray

Jun 01, 2013
Daughter has SVT
by: Mom

My daughter is 13 and has svt. Would taurin help her? She takes GABA when heart flutters start. This seems to help.

Jun 04, 2013
Daughter has SVT
by: Wray

Hi Mom Is there any pattern to her SVT? i.e. does it occur more frequently prior to menses, or around ovulation? She's 13 and going through puberty, so it could be excess oestrogen causing her problem. Please read the info I gave above on the QT interval, it could explain things. If you think so, it might be worth trying progesterone. We do have two pages you could look through, How to use progesterone cream and Menstruation. The taurine is an excellent choice too, there are papers above if you want more info. Take care Wray

Aug 10, 2013
Neurotransmitters progesterone cream
by: Anonymous

Hello can lack of neurotransmitters have an effect on progesterone cream's effectiveness? for example lack of l phenyaline and low adrenaline. because I know that progesterone increases cortisol. will this make low adrenaline problem worse?

Thank you

Aug 11, 2013
Neurotransmitters progesterone cream
by: Wray

Hi there Although hormones and neurotransmitters interact, I've not heard of a lack of one leading to the ineffectiveness of progesterone. The amino acid phenylalanine is the precursor to tyrosine. Although a non-essential amino acid, tyrosine is one of the most important. It's the precursor to the neurotransmitter dopamine, and the stress hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. It's also the precursor to the two thyroid hormones T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine), plus melanin, the pigment found in hair and skin. It's part of the enkephalin peptide involved in regulating and reducing pain, and increasing pleasure. Tyrosine is essential for any stressful situation, cold, fatigue, emotional trauma, prolonged work, sleep deprivation, it improves memory, cognition and physical performance, and is used for weight loss treatments. Lack of protein and stress lower tyrosine levels, with a subsequent reduction in dopamine. Dopamine is essential for motivation and vitality, it's also essential for a normal sexual response. A drop in dopamine increases levels of prolactin, the hormone of lactogenesis, but also an inflammatory hormone. Increased prolactin causes a drop in libido. Acute, uncontrollable stress depletes dopamine, leading to depression and a rise in cortisol and prolactin, tyrosine reverses this. The rate limiting step in dopamine synthesis is the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase. Insufficient levels of vitamin D inhibit tyrosine hydroxylase, resulting in a disturbance in the dopamine pathway. The dopamine pathway requires the progesterone receptor. Increasing protein in the diet would raise tyrosine, but taking a supplement would be quicker and more effective. Progesterone doesn't raise cortisol, in fact if enough is used it suppresses it. The adrenals secrete progesterone, which they then convert to cortisol. If the body, and therefore the adrenals are stressed, they tend to rob other sources of progesterone, notably the ovaries. In fact stress can stop the reproductive process. I do know a lack of vitamin D reduces the benefits of progesterone, see here, here and here. And a lack prevents the conversion of tyrosine to dopamine. Please have a vitamin D test done, levels drop with stress. Take care Wray

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