Deirdre

by Deirdre Edwards
(Kentucky)

I am 51 years old and about 7 months ago had a problem with an extremely dry mouth, 2 months later it felt like my mouth had been scalded, the condition is getting worse and now my eyes burn and water alot also. I've been removing all medication trying to eliminate any chemical culprits. The only thing I have remained on is my Ambien to sleep. Anxiety and depression over this condition is overwhelming at times. I've recently added a multi-vitamin and B12 back into my regimen. Also, talked my doctor into progesterone cream and I am applying 10mg a day, just started it 5 days ago and have not noticed any difference. From what I've read on here, the dosage doesn't seem to be enough. I feel terrible b/c I've read that others have suffered with this condition for 10+ years and I'm whining after 7 months. Is there any help out there for us?

Comments for Deirdre

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Dec 12, 2012
Deirdre
by: Wray

Hi Dierdre It appears you have Sjogren's syndrome. It's one of those 'autoimmune' conditions which no one knows much about. Least of all what to do about it beyond palliative care. But two things stand out for me. One, the ratio between women to men is 9:1, one of the highest of all autoimmune diseases. The other is high oestrogen levels, see here. These are three more papers on Sjogren's, see here, here and here. There are many symptoms associated with Sjogren's, but a long menstrual cycle >35 days and high prolactin levels is of interest to me. Prolactin is an inflammatory hormone, and a long menstrual cycle means more oestrogen is secreted in ratio to progesterone. Oestrogen raises prolactin levels. Two of the studies found significantly higher levels of prolactin. One of the studies found a much higher prolactin:progesterone ratio than controls. Plus the oestrogen:progesterone ratio was greater, this of course is a prime example of Oestrogen Dominance. A long menstrual cycle does not have to occur for excess oestrogen to be present. The anovulatory cycles found from about age 35 on through Peri-menopause will also cause the ratio to become skewed. And once in Menopause our fat cells still make oestrone, which is as potent an oestrogen as oestradiol. Plus many women have a defective luteal phase, where insufficient progesterone is secreted. Sjogren's is labeled as an 'autoimmune' disease, but as all these have low vitamin D, and many have low progesterone, I'm beginning to think they're not autoimmune, but merely a deficiency disease. Of interest to me many believe Sjogren's also has a genetic component, as it tends to run in families. But so do vitamin D deficiencies, in fact most of us have low levels. Low vitamin D is found in Sjogren's, see here and here. Continued below

Dec 12, 2012
Deirdre Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Dierdre Another interesting finding is a low level of sRAGES (soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products) is thought to be implicated in Sjogren's, see here. sRAGES is an anti-inflammatory, opposing the action of AGEs, see here. Glycation occurs when a sugar molecule binds to a protein or lipid molecule without the control of an enzyme. This impairs the function of the molecule, leading to advanced glycation endproducts or AGEs, resulting in many of our inflammatory diseases. Inflammation is the end result of long term oxidative stress. Most of our diseases are the result of oxidative stress, high levels of antioxidants are needed, including above all vitamin D. Please have a test done. For more info on vitamin D levels, testing etc see the Vitamin D Council, GrassrootsHealth, Birmingham Hospital and Vitamin D Links websites. Blood levels should be 70-100ng/ml or 175-250nmol/L and not the 30ng/ml or 75nmol/L most labs and doctors regard as adequate. The minimum daily dose should be 5000iu's per day, although the latest research indicates it should be 10,000iu's per day, see here. Please avoid all sugars, including those found in all grains, legumes, processed milk and sweet starchy fruits and vegetables, beers and wines. Fructose, sucrose and glucose, reduce SHBG by 80, 50 and 40% respectively, see here. Thereby allowing testosterone to rise. Oestrogen is converted from testosterone in both males and females. The more testosterone in circulation, the more oestrogen can be produced. If bound to SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin) testosterone becomes inactive, progesterone raises levels of SHBG, see here, so preventing the rise of free testosterone. Continued below

Dec 12, 2012
Deirdre Part 3
by: Wray

Hi Dierdre Sugars and large meals drop progesterone levels, see here. Plus insulin drops levels too, see here. This means SHBG also drops, another vicious cycle. Sjogren's is often found together with other autoimmune diseases such as arthritis or lupus. Here again both Progesterone and Vitamin D stand out, as both are low in these conditions. RA is regarded as a TH1 immune response-driven disease, as a higher level of Th1 is found in RA patients. Th1 induces inflammatory cytokines, Th2 induces anti-inflammatory cytokines. Studies have found that induction of Th2 cytokines can reduce inflammation. Progesterone and vitamin D cause a shift from Th1 to Th2 immune response, increasing the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. On the other hand oestrogen is an excitatory hormone and enhances the immune response, causing inflammation. Moreover, oestrogen stimulates the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP’s) which are enzymes that degrade protein and cause inflammation. Excess MMP’s are found in RA. Excess oestrogen is found in RA. I do have many papers on this, but feel this is already too long! Have a look through this website here as I think you'll find it confirms my diagnosis. 10mg/day progesterone will do nothing for you, and could increase symptoms, as it will stimulate oestrogen. I feel you will need at least 400mg/day. Please have that vitamin D test done, as I feel sure yours will be low. It's essential to get it up to 70-100ng/ml as quickly as possible. Please consider taking the other anti-inflammatories listed on the Inflammation page. Take care Wray

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