Thyroid, adrenal fatigue, epilepsy..

by Tess
(Chicago, IL)

I’ve always had irregular periods, since the day one. I was 15 and my periods were extended for up to two months, sometimes. I started having epileptic episodes, ever since and I noticed it always happens just before my period is supposed to begin.

Two years ago my doctor found that I had hyperthyroidism and I was treated with radioactive iodine and placed on Synthroid. Few months after I began feeling exhausted every day, without any energy. I couldn’t concentrate, I had symptoms like foggy brain, loss of short term memory, cold feet and hands, craving for sweets, panic attacks, slow heart beat rate, I was also losing my weight. I was tested for adrenal fatigue, and one doctor told me that my cortisol level was fine, but the other one told me that is a little bit below the normal level, and placed me on hydrocortisone 40 mg, which helped me having some of my energy back.

But…since then my epilepsy episodes were more often, and I would still have the same symptoms as before, with addition of water retantion. I finally, found this web site and read about progesterone. I’m using the cream for two months now. I got my period 36 hours after I stopped the cream the first month, but it failed the second month. Two days after I stopped the cream I had an epilepsy episode. My period is 7 days late now, and I still have some symptoms that I’m going to get my period, like breast tenderness. I read that cortisol competes with progesterone for receptors, and my question is “Does that make my progesterone level low? Should I increase the dose on my progesterone? How long do I need to use the cream to regulate my periods? . I already feel MUCH better. I feel calmer; I don’t have the panics attacks any more after just two months of using the cream, but I really think that the cause of my epilepsy episodes is a drop of progesterone level. I would be grateful for anybody’s opinion. Please, help me with some information if you experienced anything similar. Thank you, very much.

Comments for Thyroid, adrenal fatigue, epilepsy..

Click here to add your own comments

Oct 22, 2011
Thyroid, adrenal fatigue, epilepsy..
by: Wray

Hi Tess It's such a pity so little is known about progesterone, you could have done with it during puberty, as I could have done. I had depression, but you had to contend with irregular periods and seizures. It's such a simple, natural solution, but so little used. I'm delighted it's been helping you, but would have to know how much you're using to help further. It would also help to know your age too. There are so many studies on progesterone and catamenial epilepsy, it does help, see here,here, here, here, here, here and here. Progesterone can upset the cycle when first using it, but after a while it does settle down. I've run out of space so will start a new comment below. Take care Wray

Oct 22, 2011
Thyroid, adrenal fatigue, epilepsy..
by: Wray

Hi Tess What concerns me is the epilepsy episode you had, this was because progesterone dropped too suddenly. I feel you could possibly benefit by using it daily for 2-3 months, during your period too. This would ensure excess oestrogen was suppressed and the progesterone becomes dominant. I would hope that once you follow your cycle again, your won't have an episode. There's info on how to start the cycle again on our page How to use progesterone cream. Yes high cortisol does suppress progesterone. Moreover the adrenals first secrete progesterone, which they then convert into cortisol. If stressed, the adrenals rob other sources, notably the ovaries, which then upsets the reproductive cycle. I also believe you are short of vitamin D, this leads to seizures too, see here, here, here,
here, here and here. A lack of vitamin D affects the thyroid and reduces the benefits of progesterone. Please have a test done, for more info see the Vitamin D Council, GrassrootsHealth Birmingham Hospital and Vitamin D Links websites. Take care Wray

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Progesterone faq.


Search over 7,500 pages on this site...