Psoriasis solution

by Kaylana
(Latvia)

Hi Wray,
I had a severe case of psoriasis develop almost two years ago. After hours and hours of research I persuaded a doctor here (Latvia) to let me start a progesterone therapy. After 5 months now, it is almost completely gone! Amazing!

I've written about it (part 1), citing all the research as support, on my blog. Please, can you read through it to make sure I have all the details correct?

Part 2 is still in the writing phase where I will mention Natpro and how it has worked to eliminate the excess estrogen that was causing the psoriasis.

blog: lifeabroad-(myname).blogspot.com
Title: Why the cream?

Huge Thanks!!

Comments for Psoriasis solution

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Jun 06, 2012
Psoriasis solution
by: Wray

Hi Kaylana I'm so delighted about this! It's a pity so little is known about progesterone and how it can help. I'm disappointed though, as the link you gave me wouldn't open. I tried various things, but none succeeded. Please can you check the link and let me know. MMPs are implicated, these are enzymes needed to break down tissue, but in excess they cause inflammation and destruction. TNF-alpha is involved too, plus psoriasis is a Th1 mediated disease. Progesterone inhibits MMPs, TNF-alpha and switches the immune system to Th2. I'm giving you a few more papers which might interest you, see here, here, here, here and here. These papers on progesterone and MMPs, note a gelatinase is an MMP, see here and here. These on TNF-alpha, see here, here and here. These on the Th1/Th2 systems, see here and here. Vitamin D also reverses psoriasis, I find the interaction between this and progesterone fascinating, their similarities too, see Progesterone and Vitamin D. These are some papers on vitamin D and MMPs, see here, and here and here. Continued below.

Jun 06, 2012
Psoriasis solution Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Kaylana These on psoriasis here, here, here, here, here, here,
here,
here, here and here. Bless you for mentioning Natpro, I look forward to reading what you've said. Take care Wray

Jun 06, 2012
Psoriasis solution
by: Wray

Hi Kaylana Well my brother solved my problem, and gave me the URL to your blog which worked. I've put it in code, see Life Abroad in case others would like to read it. You have taken on a huge task! The T helper cell and immune system is vast and complicated, the causes of 'autoimmune' diseases shrouded in conjecture. I must confess I don't believe such a thing exists, something has upset the system to cause one. But what? Your journey through the maze highlights some of the possible causes. There's no question oestrogen is a mitogen causing cells to proliferate. There's no question it's an inflammatory hormone either. Why does it rise, oestrogen mimics in the environment, an excellent site to look through is Our Stolen Future. Oestrogen mimics in our skin care, another excellent site is Skin Deep. You mentioned phytoestrogens, these are in all foods, grains and legumes, oil seeds and oils having the highest level, see here, and here here. Although they are far weaker than oestrogen, they still have an oestrogenic effect. It depends on which camp you belong to, whether you favour their use or not. I don't. A drop in progesterone allows oestrogen to rise. Why does progesterone drop, stress, dark winter days, a lack of vitamin D, large meals, phytoestrogens and more. Progesterone is an anti-inflammatory, it inhibits mitosis so prevents cells proliferating, it suppresses oestrogen, I could go on! Vitamin D is a potent anti-inflammatory, it also prevents cells proliferating too, I gave you the page on the similarities between the two hormones. I wish I had more time to devote to this aspect. I admire all the research you've done and would love to see the continuation. It is fascinating looking at the problem as you've done, from a far simpler perspective and solution to the one currently subscribed to. Take care Wray

Jun 07, 2012
Psoriasis
by: Wray

Hi Kaylana I've found another paper which might interest you. They find it's not IL-17 which causes the psoriatic lesions, but rather IL-22, see …….
J Mol Med (2009) 87:523–536

IL-22 and IL-20 are key mediators of the epidermal alterations in psoriasis while IL-17 and IFN-γ are not
Take care Wray

Jun 10, 2012
Loads of information
by: Kaylana

Thanks Wray for the links to the research. There is so much out there and it takes a lot of time and a clear mind to wade through it all.

I will try to comment on these papers as I get through them. One thing I always check when reading is the date as this area has been expanding with new information within just the past few months. Anything more than 3 years old is read with a careful eye knowing that it is 'dated' in the medical world.

Thanks again for sharing all of this with me and others.

Aug 01, 2012
Psoriasis part 2
by: Kaylana

Hi Wray,
The links in the second section of your reply, do not open up for me. Can you please try to repost them?

Sadly, our computer was stolen on Sunday night. Gone are my 80+ papers I was reading and researching. So I'm starting over again. A computer can be replaced, but hours are lost forever...

I'm going to try to gather my thoughts and comment on a couple of things in another section.
Thanks!
Kaylana

Aug 01, 2012
Phytoestrogens in animal products
by: Kaylana

In the 2008 article, "Phytoestrogen Content of Foods of Animal Origin: Dairy Products, Eggs, Meat, Fish, and Seafood", the authors' conclusion was that phytoestrogens were found in all 115 animal products that were tested.

Why? This shouldn't be normal, I think. As they stated this unknown information has led to severely underestimating the dietary intake of phytoestrogens.

In Kaayla Daniels' blog (love her name!) she wrote an article called "Soy-ling of America: Second-hand Soy from Animal Feeds". In this post she discusses research from 2009 at Ohio University by Dante Miguel Marcial Vargas Galdos. He clearly shows that chickens fed a diet of soy isoflavones had equol and the isoflavones show up in the yolk and various meats. It raises the question about whether commercially produced eggs and chickens should have warnings for those who are allergic to soy and for those seeking to avoid its influence?

And so, back to the first bit of research. I need to find out more about the animal products that they tested and where did they come from. If they all came from farms where the animals were fed soy, then the research is tainted. Do real, *soy-free* fed animals and their products contain the phytoestrogens?

One thing that frustrates me about current research surrounding estrogens, phytoestrogens, xenoestrogens, etc., is that they fail to take into account the amount of estrogen that is taken into the body through other sources. They are busy testing the amount that is excreted, but not paying attention to the intake.

Researchers from the '30's would weigh the uterus of the female rat to see how much the estrogens affected the animal. I guess that it is now too costly to use just female rats...

Any thoughts on all of this?
Thanks!
(Back to locating a fraction of what I had before...)

Aug 01, 2012
Phytoestrogens in animal products
by: Kaylana

And another thought.
Somewhere... I had research showing that a continual exposure to phytoestrogens caused cancer cells to grow. While at extremely high doses it would kill the cells.

This gives more clarification to the medical establishment's 'claim' that phytoestrogens are healthy. Unfortunately, on the real-life scale, no one could possibly consume the levels needed to kill the cells. We are perpetually stuck in the level that encourages the cells to rapidly reproduce.

Best to avoid it at all!

Aug 06, 2012
Phytoestrogens in animal products
by: Wray

Hi Kaylana So sorry to hear about your computer, that happened to me once, I now have a external hard drive I save it all on. You had many of those papers on your blog, can you not pick some of them up from there? Thanks for pointing out that the papers wouldn't open, I'd left out a bit of coding. I've corrected the links so you will be able to access them now. I don't think it's surprising they found phytoestrogens in animal products. The grain fed will have a higher level than grass fed, but every plant contains them, so even grass fed will have some. This has been my argument all along, we are all eating plenty of 'oestrogen' in the veggies we eat and the animal products. The phytoestrogens are never checked during hormone tests, never mind the xenoestrogens. Too many women are told their oestrogen level is low, but is it? Plus women are put on to Contraceptives or HRT, or advised to take dong quay, agnus castus etc for various reasons, merely adding to the burden. Some advise taking the isoflavones, eating soy etc as protective against cancer and other symptoms, others not, it depends on your view of course. As there just as many papers showing it causes problems, these are a few here, here, here, here and here. And to avoid it, impossible! Take care Wray

Feb 16, 2013
Wonderful update!!
by: Kaylana

Hi Wray,
I have exciting news to share with you!

After two and a half years of battling psoriasis (that was so bad a doctor misdiagnosed me with a rare blood and skin cancer, remember!)and infertility (the two often go hand-in-hand), I'm 12 weeks pregnant!!!

As you well know, a year ago I radically changed my diet and eliminated all grains and most carbs. I also started using the progesterone cream since blood work showed a ratio of 120:1 of progesterone to estrogen. There were other factors that I changed as well such as eliminating environmental sources of xeno-estrogens (soaps, detergents, etc.) and phyto-estrogens (soy and its products) and increasing my Vit D.

As I began to feel better I gradually and carefully lowered my progesterone use as you have instructed in these pages. Once I stopped I had an unusual cycle that was only two weeks apart. I felt certain I was never going to get pregnant, but was surprised four weeks later!

I still use a tiny amount each day to help keep the swelling out of my fingers. The blood work two weeks ago showed a 'normal' progesterone level (but slightly low but safe) for this stage of the pregnancy. The ultrasound showed a healthy, active baby - which thrilled me immensely!

I was apprehensive going in because I haven't 'felt' pregnant for several weeks. In the past this had been an indication for me that a miscarriage was about to happen. But the heartbeat was great and all signs of development were above average.

My midwife is very interested in the research surrounding progesterone and I will be writing my story out in detail for her to help others here in Latvia.

Thank you so much for your help and support to so many people. I feel victorious now - the battle has been won!!

Feb 17, 2013
Wonderful update!!
by: Wray

Hi Kaylana Oh what wonderful news!! It only goes to show what awful food grains are. Problem of course is we've been fed the lie they are the 'staff of life'. It's almost like some conspiracy theory, keep them eating grains, their minds will dim and we've got them! I was so delighted you made that comment to David about them. And about the good fats too, undoubtedly he's been told to avoid all fats. I can't remember if I ever gave you our page on Pregnancy and this one here too. Don't hesitate to use more, rather have it higher than 'low but safe'. It's so critical for brain development, see here. But you're so used to using it now, you'll know when you need more. Wonderful news your midwife was interested in progesterone, now if the word could be spread there too.....!!! I'm curious, do you speak Latvian? Or manage with English? Bless you for the kind words. Please keep in touch too. Take care Wray

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