Psoriasis etc

by Shirley
(BC, Canada)

Hi there
I have long suspected from various things I have read that I have had estrogen dominance, but have never done anything about it. Also, I have psoriasis and now psoriatic arthritis. I always wondered why when I was pregnant my psoriasis cleared up. I have had 3 pregnancies and I am now 52. When I came upon your site I again started reading and learning and I saw something about psoriasis - it got me excited even though the doctors always told me there was no hormonal connection to psoriasis. I always wondered though.....after I had my babies it always came back. I have had psoriasis since 16. I have had many of the symptoms of estrogen dominance, but not so much now, have been in perimenopause for a long time (over 10 years). Now in the last 8 months I have had only 2 periods, so do not suffer the hormonal migraines and monthly bloating and sore breasts etc (thankfully). I started using your cream on July 3 (about 6 weeks ago) and have not yet noticed any changes in the psoriasis. IF it is going to help, how long should it take before I notice some improvement, and how much should I use? I have been using 1/2 tsp a day in divided doses. sorry this is so long, thank you for your site and your help. Shirley

Comments for Psoriasis etc

Click here to add your own comments

Aug 18, 2012
Psoriasis
by: Kaylana

Hi Shirley,
It was good to hear your story. Wray will answer soon with a list of studies, but I wanted to voice my support too.
While I haven't suffered from the psoriasis for along as you, I did develop it fast and furious - so much that the high levels of estrogen have been linked to two miscarriages and now an inability to get pregnant. But that is not your worries right now, I understand.

Given the amount that you said you were using, it is not enough. I use the cream directly on the sores, even in my hair. I apply it several times a day with a good dose before going to bed. Anytime I feel stress or even think of something stressful I can start to itch. I immediately grab the cream. It helps to calm and soothe the itching within minutes.

As for the number of sores and severity? I just need to say that I have regained my life, freedom and ability to do the things I love so dearly! My hands were once so bad that I couldn't even hold a pen or type - forget about playing the piano! Now, this week I finished hand sewing lace onto a friend's veil! I was excited at the return of my mobility throughout my body! No more swelling and arthritis!

It takes time. I've been using the cream for 7 months and sometimes a stubborn sore will develop. I increase my vitamin D and zinc and try to relax and lower my stress levels. Healing takes time. Be encouraged!

Aug 21, 2012
Psoriasis etc
by: Wray

Hi Shirley Psoriasis is one of those 'grey' areas, which I find strange, as it's all too apparent hormones play a role. Cortisol is a hormone, and is the first option in obtaining relief. It's been found that the formation of cortisol in the skin of psoriasis sufferers malfunctions, see here. Cortisol is made from progesterone in the skin. Stress plays a big role too, see here and here. Progesterone drops with stress, but if enough is used it helps the stress response, particularly one of it's metabolites, allopregnanolone, see here, here, here, here and here. Not only that but the Th1 inflammatory cytokines are increased in psoriasis, both progesterone and vitamin D switch the system to the anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokines. This accounts for the reason your psoriasis cleared up while pregnant, we make over 400ng/ml in the third trimester, see here. One of progesterone's roles in pregnancy is to prevent the increase in Th1 cytokines, if it weren't for progesterone, the foetus would be rejected by the mother because of this. There is also increasing evidence that a lack of vitamin D leads to psoriasis, see here, here, here, here and here. Continued below.

Aug 21, 2012
Psoriasis etc Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Shirley And more here,
here,
here, here and here. And to arthritis, see here, here,here, here, here, here, here and here. Both Progesterone and Vitamin D have a fundamental affect on cell function. Vitamin D levels also drop with stress, plus a lack reduces the benefits of progesterone. But you live in Canada, where vitamin D levels are some of the lowest in the world, please have a test done. For more info on vitamin D levels, test kits etc see the Vitamin D Council, GrassrootsHealth and Birmingham Hospital websites. Blood levels should be 70-100ng/ml (175-250nmol/L) and not the 30ng/ml (75nmol/L) most labs and doctors regard as adequate. The minimum daily dose should be 5000iu's per day, although the latest research indicates it should be 10,000iu's per day, see here. Vitamin D is also a hormone, D3 is converted firstly into calcidiol by the liver, then into the hormone calcitriol by the kidneys. Continued below.

Aug 21, 2012
Psoriasis etc Part 3
by: Wray

The amount of progesterone you are using is only giving you about 80mg/day, I recommend at least 100-200mg/day, more if symptoms are severe. Progesterone can help with arthritis, it’s always low. RA is regarded as a TH1 immune response-driven disease, as a higher level of Th1 is found in RA patients. Th1 induces inflammatory cytokines, Th2 induces anti-inflammatory cytokines. Studies have found that induction of Th2 cytokines can reduce inflammation. Progesterone causes a shift from Th1 to Th2 immune response, increasing the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. On the other hand oestrogen is an excitatory hormone and enhances the immune response, causing inflammation. Moreover, oestrogen stimulates the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP’s) which are enzymes that degrade protein and cause inflammation. Excess MMP’s are found in RA. Excess oestrogen is found in RA, see here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here. Kaylana has some encouraging words of advice too, she's done a great deal of research on it too. Take care Wray

Aug 21, 2012
Psoriasis
by: Shirley

Hi Kaylana

Thank you for your encouragement.
I really am wondering how much I should be using? As of today, I have doubled it to 1 tsp a day. I do use it right on my scalp, elbows etc where there are plaques, but always as part of my daily dose.
Do you think 1 tsp is enough?
Realistically I don't know how long I can afford to be on it, but I really wanted to try.
I do understand that healing takes time, but how long do you think it should be until I notice some encouraging sign of improvement?
Thanks again for your reply.
Shirley

Aug 21, 2012
Psoriasis
by: Shirley

Thank you Wray for all your help and comments. It will take me awhile to go through all of this. I have doubled my use to 1 tsp a day, perhaps I should go up to 1 1/2?
Thank you again for this site and all the wonderful information you provide.
Shirley

Aug 23, 2012
Psoriasis help
by: Kaylana

Hi Shirley,
As I said, healing takes time. Since each case is unique, only your body will know how long it will take. For example: my young son showed remarkable improvements within days! For me it took about two weeks to get beyond the estrogen dominance and start healing. Only when I upped my Vit D did healing improve more rapidly.

And still some sores are stubborn and I'm not sure why. In some ways too, I had a reversal of the disease. The first sores were on my palms and then arms and legs with the hair being the last breakout. I nearly cried when I saw my hands start to break out again, but they quickly faded and never erupted. Oh, was I thankful!

My hair is another case though. While it is finally growing back, anytime I get stressed (robbery a month ago, moving plans, etc.) it starts coming out again along with developing more sores. Frustrating! I force myself to find some relaxation time and get the hormones back under control.

Another variable was the type of cream used. While I love the Natpro, the healing seemed slower and it wasn't as quickly absorbed. While trying Pro-Gest my skin felt more moisturized. (Wray, any input on why?) Natpro was easier to put in my hair though.

I'm certain my skin and hair were damaged from the harsh medicines that the 'top' dermatologist prescribed. It just takes time and patience.

Don't forget to stay away from all grains (wheat, oats, rice, corn) and avoid carbs - anything the body can turn into sugar.

Also, don't leave home without the cream. You never know when you will encounter a stressful event. (Shopping with my 3 children can turn stressful at the drop of a hat!)

Please update us all when you notice any changes.
Cheers!

Aug 24, 2012
Psoriasis
by: Wray

Hi Shirley I did give you rather a mouthful to read, but it does help to understand it better. Kaylana has done a huge amount too, unfortunately her computer was stolen and of course all the papers she's collected. Such a pity as she could have passed some on to you. 1tsp is giving you about 170mg/day, see if that's enough. It does work out costly, usually in the early days as you're trying to suppress excess oestrogen etc. But once you've got it under control the amount can be reduced. Kaylana would be the best to ask advice of as I don't have psoriasis, and very few have written in about it. So I've got no one to refer to. In a case it helps you, we do have a 30% discount on 20 tubes, which helps somewhat. Although the initial outlay is big, unless you can find a friend to share, or put your whole family on it as one woman has! Thanks for the kind words about the site. Take care Wray

Aug 27, 2012
psoriatic arthritis
by: Susie

My sister lives in Michigan and has severe psoriatic arthritis. She is 56 yrs old and was diagnosed about 10 years ago. Her skin clears up somewhat if she sits in the sun for about a half hour everyday that the weather in Michigan allows. Sad to say, that is not very much out of the year that the weather is warm enough to sit outside exposing her limbs with the sun out. it also happens to rain quite a bit in the summer there which does not help. it is obvious that it is the vitamin D that is helping the skin problems that psoriatic arthritis brings.

She most likely takes a vitamin D supplement but I am sure it is not very high of a dosage. What dosage of vitamin D should she take every day to help her condition? She also suffers from extreme inflammation and joint pain and stiffness. She is very puffy all over. Her scalp flakes to an extreme do to her P/S. She has patches of psoriasis all over her body. She is seeing a specialist and is on many medications and supplements. Although I don't know the medications or supplements. I have seen the amounts of pills she takes daily. Can you recommend anything that would help her and the doses she should take. Progesterone, Vitamin D, etc???

Sep 13, 2012
psoriatic arthritis
by: Wray

Hi Susie M Firstly I must apologise about not replying to this comment you made, I've no idea why. I remember reading it on the server site, but it didn't come through to me to answer. I only found it again by putting your name and psoriasis into the search field. I would ask you to get your sister to read the papers I've given Shirley. I've given her all I have on the subject. Kaylana has good advice too. Michigan sounds a bit like Canada with respect to sunshine. Your sister is taking a good dose of vitamin D, but she should have a test done. It could be she's not absorbing it, or the psoriasis is so severe it's not sufficient. Once she knows her level the amount she should take could be determined. She needs to get her level to around 100ng/ml. As you pointed out, her skin clears a bit when she sits in the sun. Is there any chance of her finding a sun bed she could use? Topical analogues of vitamin D have been used with some success in studies, but I'm not in favour of synthetic drugs. Typically it appears no study has been done using natural vitamin D in topical form. There are some vitamin D creams on the market, we're developing one too but it's not ready yet. Although I don't believe the 5000iu's/ml, the highest found in some of them, is high enough to help. Possibly if she used that in conjunction with taking it, it might, I'm sure it would soothe the skin. And of course progesterone. Any severe problem requires high amounts, so I would suggest about 500mg/day. As you know using too little exacerbates the inflammatory response due to stimulating oestrogen. Those papers I gave Shirley show oestrogen is high in all RA cases, so too the MMPs. The last thing your sister needs is to ramp those up. You say she takes supplements, often these are meaningless as the dose is too low. She needs large quantities of antioxidants to combat the Inflammation. Take care Wray


Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Progesterone faq.


Search over 7,500 pages on this site...