Post-stroke dizziness, anxiety, etc

by Tanya
(South Dakota)

I had a stroke in 2009 at the age of 39. It was a clot, presumably formed in my heart, passing through PFO to the brain. It was a large clot and my main symptom of the stroke was intense vertigo.

My lingering symptoms were dizziness, which as time passed, localized to just before period and around ovulation. Those have mostly passed now, thankfully, but sometimes do recur.

I consider myself hypoglycemic (read something recently about that being called complex hunger and related to neurotransmitter releases after eating improving symptoms rather than blood sugar issues), and have been all my life. I had an ovarian cyst burst at 14 (menses at 11). I used BCP for about 7 yrs.

When I had my second child, I used Prog only BCP and felt the best I have ever felt. I have used Prog cream in the past and had good results as well.

A chiro suggested the dizzy spells were related to fluid levels, and that the changing pressure in my skull was pressing on the area of the stroke. I also read where prog is used to reduce swelling after brain trauma.

I am dealing with my body sabotaging me...in that no matter how ordered my thoughts are, my body goes into panic/defensive mode over nothing. My Vit D was 120...up from 60 2 yrs ago, 20 a year before that, and have stopped supplementing for now to get it down a bit.

I am taking tyrosine, 5HTP, gaba, zinc, magnesium, chromium, and other adrenal support vitamins per a nutritional consusltant I found (finally!). I have been no grains for 45 days and avoiding MSG. She thought my headaches would be related to MSG but I think it is more about my cycle. My anxiety symptoms are improved, but are worse the week of and after my cycle.

I have excessive fluid/mucus with ovualtion, including brown streaks and sludge. My periods are bright red and heavy, but not clots, more like lots of fluid.

My libido is nill. My score on your questionnairre was 60!

I have suspected hormones, and thyroid issues, which seem to parallel the prog issues if I read your symptoms list correctly. I am looking for a reason why my adrenals are shot, because healing them will not be effective if there is an underlying cause.

I am interested to hear your thoughts on my symptoms. Thanks!

Comments for Post-stroke dizziness, anxiety, etc

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Jan 14, 2013
Post-stroke dizziness, anxiety, etc
by: Wray

Hi Tanya I suspect the clot was due to low vitamin D, as you said your level was 20ng/ml 3 years ago. Low vitamin D increases the risk, see here, here, here and here. So too does low progesterone, see here and here. Although Contraceptives also increase the risk. Unfortunately the 'prog' BCP you used was not, but a progestin. Changes in fluid levels can cause dizziness as it affects the balance in the ears. These have many oestrogen and progesterone receptor sites. If the ratio of oestrogen to progesterone is too high, oedema occurs, see here, here, here and here. Oedema also affects the brain too, as your chiro suggested. Luckily progesterone is an excellent diuretic. As you have read it does help Traumatic Brain Injury. They have also found it helps in other brain injuries, one being stroke. The link I've given you gives the papers on this too. Eating something does help blood glucose issues, and something sweet does raise serotonin levels. So symptoms would improve. But I suspect it's due more to keeping blood glucose stable, than the release of neurotransmitters. If blood glucose drops too quickly, the brain sends a message to the adrenals to make adrenaline. This is the message for the liver to convert glycogen into glucose to prevent it dropping further. With unstable blood glucose the adrenals would be constantly over worked. Oestrogen de-stabilises blood glucose, whereas progesterone stabilises it, see here. With excess adrenaline being created it doesn't surprise me you are in panic mode so often! There's more info on our Insulin Resistance page. Continued below

Jan 14, 2013
Post-stroke dizziness, anxiety, etc Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Tanya We have a page on Anxiety, which also explains the panic. We do have a page on headaches and Migraines too. I think MSG would be a very minor issue, unless you ate a huge amount of processed foods. The fact your symptoms are worse around ovulation and your period speaks volumes about a hormonal imbalance. Blood, spotting, pain can all occur at ovulation, see here, here and here. Severe 'PMS' symptoms can occur too. It's always been believed, and still is by everyone including the medical profession, that progesterone is only produced by the corpus luteum after ovulation. But as far back as 1930 it was thought there must be another source. This was confirmed in the 1960's, and re-confirmed in the 1980's, that there is an exponential rise of progesterone about 50 hours prior to ovulation. This surge comes from the brain, see here, here, here and here. Oestrogen also rises exponentially about 50 hours prior to ovulation. Unless there is the progesterone surge too, there is nothing to counter the oestrogen effect. This explains why many women get migraines, seizures, palpitations, panic attacks and asthma attacks around ovulation. The same reasoning can be applied to the symptoms that occur during progesterone withdrawal prior to bleeding. Progesterone is vital for Libido, vitamin D too. I'm pleased your level is so high, it only becomes toxic at 200ng/ml. You should hopefully begin to see this helping you. Continued below

Jan 14, 2013
Post-stroke dizziness, anxiety, etc Part 3
by: Wray

Hi Tanya A lack affects every organ, system, and cell, it also reduces the benefits of progesterone, see here, here, here, here and here. If you do have thyroid issues, these should be helped by the higher vitamin D, see here, here, here and here. All the supps you're taking are excellent, and should begin helping too. So it appears you have probably been short of progesterone for many years, your vitamin D too, and had high oestrogen. This is an excitatory, inflammatory hormone. Oestrogen stimulates glutamate, our most excitatory neurotransmitter, see here. It increases free radicals, plus destroying beta-endorphin neurons in the brain, these produce endorphins which promote a feeling of well being and relaxation. Beta-endorphins also appear to boost the immune system, protecting against cancer, see here. This paper says "Although it is widely accepted that exposure to estradiol throughout life contributes to reproductive aging.... Recent evidence ..... of chronic estradiol-mediated accelerated reproductive senescence now suggests such a hypothesis. It has been shown that chronic estradiol exposure results in the destruction of greater than 60% of all beta-endorphin neurons in the arcuate nucleus .....This loss of opioid neurons is prevented by treatment with antioxidants indicating that it results from estradiol-induced formation of free radicals", see here. Continued below

Jan 14, 2013
Post-stroke dizziness, anxiety, etc Part 4
by: Wray

Hi Tanya Whereas progesterone protects against glutamate toxicity, it also increases BDNF (brain-derived neuroptrophic factor) in itself protective, see here and here. It also protects against calcium induced excitotoxicity, see here. I'm pleased you've been given only magnesium, by opposing calcium, which constricts muscles and causes excitotoxicity, it relaxes us. Your score was very high! Although I normally recommend 100-200mg/day progesterone, I feel you will need at least 200mg/day if not more. Particularly as you have stressed adrenals. These rob other sources of progesterone when they are stressed, as they can't make sufficient to convert into cortisol. So levels of progesterone drop. The stress response over rides any other. So not only are your adrenals making adrenaline, they are also making cortisol too, really overworked! But because progesterone lessens the stress response, it does help the adrenals. Plus supplying supplemental, the adrenals have plenty to make cortisol with, which should begin dropping once things calm down. The adrenaline should drop too. Take care Wray

Jan 19, 2013
Thanks and more
by: Tanya

I appreciate the response. I am to go see my nutritionist on Monday. I am glad that my suspicions are supported by your knowledge/research as well. Perhaps this can be the final piece in the healing puzzle. I am going to digest what you have shared and I may be back with more questions! :) Thank you for this site!

Jan 24, 2013
Thanks and more
by: Wray

Hi Tanya I'm pleased the info helped you, and I do hope progesterone will too, and that your high vitamin D level will begin to kick in. Please don't let it drop again, so if you could have another test about 1 month after stopping it, that would be good. It actually drops quite quickly. Then I think the maintenance dose of 5000iu per day will be adequate. And that 200mg/day progesterone I suggested you try was only an estimate. If you feel it's not helping you, please increase it. You might like to read these comments from others who've used high amounts, see here, here and here, Scroll to 'Possibly Reconsider'. I would love to hear how you get on. And thanks for the kind words! Take care Wray

Feb 01, 2013
Dosage per tube
by: Tanya

If I read correctly on other pages, I would use 10 inches of cream a day? Split between two doses? And at that rate one tube would last 10 days? (1 inch = 20 mg, so 10 = 200, and the tube has 2000 mg in it). Do I start wherever I am in my cycle right now or do I wait until a cycle starts and go from there? Thanks.

Feb 02, 2013
DHEA
by: Tanya

While reading the links on the high-dosers, I read that you don't recommend DHEA. I have been taking it and krill oil per my consultant. Can you tell me more about why not? I have tried the fish oil thing several times with different brands and never got the relief/benefits that I've heard about/expected. And if it is releated to progesterone/hormones then I would like to know more before I start that to avoid complicating my relief!

Feb 02, 2013
Delete DHEA
by: Tanya

Nevermind on the DHEA I thought it was DHA, the fish oil thing. You can delete that comment. Thx.

Feb 03, 2013
Dosage per tube
by: Wray

Hi Tanya You're getting confused between length and weight. A mg or milligram is a weight measurement. A millimetre or mm is length. 1 inch is actually 2.54cm or 25.4 millimetres. It's best to use a 5ml (millilitre) measuring spoon, as the cream is volumetric. This site here has metric measuring spoons. But it does depend on what brand of cream you use too, as they vary in strength. It appears you might be considering the Natpro, as you say a tube contains 2000mg. In which case if you want to try the 200mg/day I suggested, you would need 6ml. Which is 1 1/5 teaspoons, but using a 5 ml teaspoon. Many assume I mean one used for stirring coffee or tea, but as these vary between 3 to 6 ml, they should not be used. You are right about using 200mg/day, the tube would last 10 days. As you have severe symptoms, I would advise using the progesterone daily, through any bleeding for 2-3 months or until stable. The cycle can then be followed again. There's more info on our page How to use progesterone cream. Just in case someone suggests you do take DHEA, this is why I don't believe women should take it, see here, here, here and here. Take care Wray

Mar 20, 2013
Starting cream
by: Tanya

I will be starting the cream tomorrow....praying for success.

Mar 22, 2013
Temp monitoring
by: Tanya

I read your reply here about the timing of progesterone. It reminded me of a question I have. Would it be best to take basal temps each morning, like I did when I was doing natural family planning (Taking Charge of Your Fertility) and use that data to decide when to start/stop as well as to track results? If so, please let me know how to apply the temp data to the cream usage.

Mar 23, 2013
Temp monitoring
by: Wray

Hi Tanya Due to the many symptoms you have I suggest you use the progesterone daily, through any bleeding, for about 2-3 months, or until stable. This ensures progesterone becomes dominant and suppresses any excess oestrogen. Once you feel ready you can begin following your cycle again. There's more info on our page How to use progesterone cream. Take care Wray

Mar 24, 2013
high dose
by: Tanya

well, I experimented with high dose unintentionally! I was using 5 ml 2x a day instead of split into 2 doses. I sure hope this helps my brain work better! So cutting back tonight to the 1/2 tsp mark! I am using a cough syrup measuring cup since it is 5 ml/tsp and has 1/2 t mark too! It is not perfect but I feel it is closer than chancing my measuring spoons for now. Will look into the spoons you recommend later.

As for the charting, I understand your recommendation to use 2 mos straight or so. I was just wondering about it for the after months/other folk. I am a lot of hypothetical! :)

Mar 25, 2013
high dose
by: Wray

Hi Tanya Please don't reduce too quickly, as adverse symptoms can be experienced if too fast, and reducing to half again could affect you. A cough syrup measure is good, as they are accurate, just that a 'cup' is not as easy as a measuring spoon to get the cream out. The 2-3 months of using progesterone without a break is a suggestion, it could require longer to become stable. Some have continued for months without one. Let me know how you get on. Take care Wray

Apr 06, 2013
Post dr visit
by: Tanya

I met with a CNP yesterday who specializes in alternative health. She prescribed LDN, something I have been wanting to take but had no idea where to find a doc that would prescribe! Also, she is having me take my temps to confirm diagnosis of Wilson's Temperatuure Syndrome. When I read about it, I saw me all over the page! My first temp this a.m., three hours after waking, was 97 degrees. no wonder I feel cold all the time.

She did blood tests for thyroid (expects them to be 'normal'), cortisol, dhea, (assuming she is checking the ratio, and I recall your warning about taking DHEA so will see what she says next visit), and blood count.

She was happy with my dosage on the cream as starting point and she wants to get me to only bleeding 4 days per month and nothing else, and will help me with the cream to achieve that! :)

I have only been using it for a couple of weeks, so onward and upward! Thanks!

Apr 07, 2013
Post dr visit
by: Wray

Hi Tanya Normal oral body temperature in adult men and women ranges between 33.2–38.2 °C (92–101 °F). Typical average temperatures are 37.0 °C (98.6 °F). In women it varies between the follicular and the luteal phase. During the follicular phase, i.e. from the first day of menstruation to ovulation, it ranges from 36.45 to 36.7 °C (97.6 to 98.1 °F). During the 12-14 day luteal phase, i.e. after ovulation to menstruation, temperature increases by 0.15 - 0.45 °C (0.2 - 0.9 °F) due to the increased metabolic rate caused by rapidly rising levels of progesterone. Temperature ranges between 36.7 - 37.3°C (98.1 - 99.2°F) during the luteal phase, but drops down to follicular levels within a few days of bleeding. Oestrogen lowers temps, progesterone raises them, this is all it could be, and not your thyroid. I would be interested to hear. I'm also extremely interested in hearing why the LDN? Take care Wray

Apr 07, 2013
LDN
by: Tanya

I have been hoping to find LDN since I first started reading about it. When she mentioned it, suggesting I research it, I practically jumped up and hugged her! Since I knew what it was etc, she prescribed it. Because of the past attempts to diagnose/treat me for MS, lyme, lupus, arthritis, fibromyalgia, etc., and the stroke-induced aphasia, I am very interested in its possible positive impact on my health.

My family has history of thyroid issues, and I know that my temp is not 'normal' as I am always so much colder than everyone around me. I know that should fluctuate with the progesterone too, but regardless of cycle I am cold.

I read about the adrenal/sex hormone/thyroid being like a three legged stool, and the symptoms do certainly overlap a great deal. So am thinking we are getting at all three legs now and hope that in the end the prog is all I need to maintain. The t3 for wilson's is temporary hopefully. But all will wait until tests, etc.

Apr 10, 2013
LDN
by: Wray

Hi Tanya I'm fascinated you know about the LDN as not many do. It has been used successfully for MS, but of course there are the usual sceptics who scorn it's use. So I would be very interested to hear how you do on it. It's difficult to comprehend the number of 'diagnoses' you were given! If your family has a history of thyroid issues, it could be they are all deficient in vitamin D, it would be worth all of them having tests done. It's such an important nutrient. Do you eat wheat? This drops temps as it drops blood glucose. My brother's secretary used to live on wheat and wore jerseys even in summer. She warmed up when she stopped eating so much. The three legged stool is a very good description, you can't look at one without looking at the others. Let me know how you get on, I'm very interested. Take care Wray

Apr 10, 2013
Informed
by: Tanya

I have been getting Dr Whitaker's newsletters for a long time, and when I had my first open hip surgery in 08 that didn't go so well, (had two more), I started looking hard into natural medicine.

The thyroid in family is cousins/great aunts mostly and they had nodules etc and some had them removed. I avoid grains, and white carbs, and have good luck with weight control that way. I have always been hypoglycemic and had to be well fed and well rested to be pleasant/function.

I read that chronic inflammation interferes with the skin's ability to make Vit D with sunshine. So to make headway against the inflammation I started supplementing heavily.

I think part of the diagnoses issues was the PFO as that causes neurological issues (but the mainstream docs don't 'see' it). I have B+ blood which is thicker type and the aspirin warmed me up after the stroke, so I think there is something there too. My Hg is always high end of normal, and iron could be a factor.

I am just complicated! :)But it has led me to lots of information/topics.

Apr 11, 2013
Informed
by: Wray

Hi Tanya It's so interesting so many turning to natural healing methods having found drugs etc don't work. I'm hypoglycaemic too, and also have to be well fed to be pleasant! My poor mother found that out when I was very young, I became a monster when my blood glucose dropped. Unfortunately chronic inflammation causes most of our diseases, not just affecting the skin. If only doctors would concentrate on this, rather than give drugs for a symptom. We all need to take large doses of antioxidants now there is so much pollution. Thanks for the name of the book you sent our admin department, sounds most interesting. I looked through the contents page and how right they are, our hormones are in havoc now. All the EDCs we have to contend with, if interested this is an excellent site.....Our Stolen Future. Take care Wray

Apr 20, 2013
update
by: Tanya

I started on the LDN last night. I saw my nutritionist yesterday, and my pH and oxidative stress are normal! WOW! Still need to get my mineral content up. And the crying fits when I try to talk about anything 'important' need to stop! Upping the GABA. Also, received instructions from CNP about thyroid, and will be taking a thyroid supplement (iodine), and an adrenal one she recommended when they come. I realized i am having fewer bad days and accomplishing more than I have in a while, so even tho the crying is still a big deal to me, I need to remember that I AM better! :)

Apr 22, 2013
update
by: Wray

Hi Tanya I'm very pleased the pH and oxidative stress have come down. What do you attribute this too, as you hadn't started the LDN at that point? The crying should go if you use enough progesterone. I think I told you I had that too, became exhausted with crying at times. Do let me know how you get on, I'm most intrigued about the LDN. If it helps you I'd like to suggest it to others. Take care Wray

Apr 22, 2013
Reasons
by: Tanya

I don't really know what they key was for the oxidative stress, but the two changes I made between the 2nd and 3rd test were replacing daily full aspirin with APS II and Feverfew, and the progesterone cream. :) I am on a lot of supplements as well, but have been on mostly the same regimen since December, and this is the first big decrease. My minerals are still low, so will be adding in a new multivitamin. My iron tests are confusing, but since I've read of a connection between vascular iron deposits near brain creating MS symptoms (I don't have MS but have had symptoms), my consultant wants me to try taking plant iron to chelate the animal iron. Her theory is the iron is coming from my diet since I don't take anything with iron in it. We raise cattle, so eat beef once a day, eggs and spinach for lunch. But when I look at my dietary intake, it is still less than RDA...guess I just store it well? Vitamin C makes iron more absorbable,but am only taking 4000 a day, and don't want to decrease, although I could now that I am off aspirin. I took it because ulcers occur when aspirin depletes vit c from stomach lining. But it also helps me avoid the bugs, along wiht the D. Started new thyroid and adrenal supplements tonight. Will keep you posted on my LDN results. THanks for all you do to help!

Apr 23, 2013
Reasons
by: Wray

Hi Tanya Well progesterone is an antioxidant, so that would certainly have helped. Have the iron deposits been found, if not then I don't see why taking plant iron will be necessary. Incidentally MS responds to both progesterone, see here,here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here here. Continued below

Apr 23, 2013
Reasons Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Tanya And vitamin D, see here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here. And as I've said before, please keep in touch about the LDN. Thanks for the kind words! Take care Wray

May 04, 2013
Progesterone Iodine Thyroid
by: Tanya

Read this on Mercola site today and thought of you, Wray...

"There is simply no question that optimizing your iodine levels is essential for thyroid health. Hypothyroidism disproportionately affects women at a rate of about 9 to 1 in the US. The reason for this is that the female hormone estrogen inhibits the absorption of iodine.

According to Dr. Flechas, hypothyroidism is associated with up to 80-90 percent free estrogen levels, compared to the normal value of 40-60 percent free estrogen. Hyperthyroidism is associated with only 20 percent free estrogen levels, and low iodine intake can lead to a hyperestrogenic state."

SOURCE : see here.

So perhaps my thyroid issues will correct with the use of progesterone, as it will allow my body to absorb iodine. Interesting that the CPN suggested iodine supplement rather than T3. Starting to make sense...

May 06, 2013
Progesterone Iodine Thyroid
by: Wray

Hi Tanya I've just read that page too, and in fact I've just given it to another woman writing in to this site. I know oestrogen slows the thyroid down, but didn't know that it inhibits the uptake of iodine. So by suppressing the excess oestrogen, progesterone should help. It is a multi faceted approach that's needed, progesterone alone won't cure everything. The problem is always finding out what else is needed, and only tests, symptoms and trail and error will correct it. You are taking tyrosine too, as that is another essential nutrient. Without it iodine has nothing to combine with to make T3 and T4. How are you reacting to the LDN? Let me know how you get on. Take care Wray

May 07, 2013
LDN
by: Tanya

There were a few nights the first week that I had an episode of rapid heart rate and dizziness/anxiety for a few hours. I had eaten gluten those days, as well as two of the days took the new thyroid and adrenal supplements. I stopped taking them and avoided gluten and so far so good. I tried gluten again one day to see if that was the cause, and although I did react to it after eating it, I slept fine. In fact, I am sleeping really well and feeling 'normal' again! Brain fog has lifted. Praise the Lord! The gluten induced a bit of a fog, and since LDN and gluten work on opioid receptors, it appears those may be the parts of my brain that aren't working quite right. Just a theory on my part.

I spoke to the doc about the supplements, and am starting with just one, once/day for a week, then adding second at night for a week, then repeat with the second supplement. Want to see if/which one is causing reaction. Both have cautions about heart issues. The adrenal is first, and then the thyroid, so will have to wait to see about the iodine/progesterone/tyrosine.

Still itching and need to try the vit D idea...

May 08, 2013
LDN
by: Wray

Hi Tanya This is such good news. I'm relieved you stopped the other supplements as you'll never know which it was. Far better to introduce them one at a time as you intend. Delighted you're sleeping better too. Gluten is not good for most of us, in fact all grains should be avoided. They've been only recently introduced into our diet, within the last 5 to 10 thousand years. We haven't adjusted to them, and doubt we ever will! Will be interested to hear which affects you, it's always good to hear from others about their experiments. And please try the vitamin D! Take care Wray

May 09, 2013
Vit D
by: Tanya

Vitamin D is a staple for me, except for the few months b/w the 120 test and the 57 test.

I would disagree with the timeline/grain reasons, but I do know that it is an issue for some.

I've referred a few folks from the LDN forum over here to hear what you have to say about prog. :)

May 10, 2013
Vit D
by: Wray

Hi Tanya Oh yes I know you take vitamin D, it was whether using it topically would help you. Bless you for the referrals! Take care Wray

May 12, 2013
Itching
by: Tanya

Gotcha! I started taking grapefruit seed extract again, to fight yeast, in case that was the itch source, and it seems to have stopped. We'll see if that continues.

May 18, 2013
Itching
by: Wray

Hi Tanya It never occurred to me to suggest a fungal infection! We do have a page on Candida you could look through. The best I've found is MCT oil, as it kills not only candida but other fungi and bacteria too, see here, here, here and here. The last paper is extraordinary, it says "Caprylic acid is superior to & less expensive than Diflucan, & has potential application for anti-cancer, anti-aging, anti-Alzheimer's disease, anti-Autism, anti-infection, & general circulatory improvement." Let me know how you get on with the GSE. Take care Wray

Oct 26, 2013
Tyrosine for hot flashes
by: Tanya

Checking in to report doing well on all fronts with 100 mg progesterone daily and 3 mg LDN. I had to reduce my tyrosine when my thyroid kicked in (heart pounding). I just read that dopamine levels drop when estrogen levels drop with age, and it is related to the hot flashes etc. And tyrosine is the supplement used to increase dopamine. Have you studied/recommended tyrosine for menopause symptoms as well? I know I had no clue about supplementing neurotransmitters until I found a great nutritional consultant. Missing pieces of my puzzle for sure.

Oct 31, 2013
Tyrosine for hot flashes
by: Wray

Hi Tanya Tyrosine can send us into overdrive if too much is used. Can you find the reference to dropping oestrogen causes dopamine to drop, I've not heard that before and it makes me suspicious. Oestradiol does drop with menopause, as it's made in the ovaries. But we continue making oestrone in our fat cells to the day we die. I find it hard to believe a neurotransmitter would be affected by oestradiol, and if dopamine, why not all the other neurotransmitters? I might not have recommended it to you, but I'm always asking people to increase their amino acid intake. When stressed the neurotransmitters drop, the only way to boost them is taking the aminos. This is my info on tyrosine...... Although a non-essential amino acid, tyrosine is one of the most important. It's the precursor to the neurotransmitter dopamine, and the stress hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. It's also the precursor to the two thyroid hormones T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine), plus melanin, the pigment found in hair and skin. It's part of the enkephalin peptide involved in regulating and reducing pain, and increasing pleasure. Tyrosine is essential for any stressful situation, cold, fatigue, emotional trauma, prolonged work, sleep deprivation, it improves memory, cognition and physical performance, and is used for weight loss treatments. Lack of protein and stress lower tyrosine levels, with a subsequent reduction in dopamine. Dopamine is essential for motivation and vitality, it's also essential for a normal sexual response. A drop in dopamine increases levels of Prolactin, the hormone of lactogenesis, but also an inflammatory hormone. Increased prolactin causes a drop in Libido. Acute, uncontrollable stress depletes dopamine, leading to depression and a rise in cortisol and prolactin, tyrosine reverses this. The rate limiting step in dopamine synthesis is the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase. Insufficient levels of vitamin D inhibit tyrosine hydroxylase, resulting in a disturbance in the dopamine pathway. The dopamine pathway requires the progesterone receptor. Please have a vitamin D test done, levels drop with stress. A lack of tyrosine can lead to addictions to tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, heroin and sweet foods. These substances raise dopamine levels. Tyrosine is used effectively for substance abuse...... and of course who of us isn't stressed at the moment. Add that stress to a woman going through peri-menopause, and she will be very short of tyrosine. Take care Wray

Nov 02, 2013
dopamine estrogen reference
by: Tanya

Excerpt from... http://www.ehow.com/about_5542496_symptoms-low-dopamine-levels.html

In Women

Low dopamine levels in women cause symptoms similar to those associated with decreasing levels of the hormone estrogen. For example, low dopamine will generally increase the adverse effects that often arise during menopause. These include hot flashes, night sweats, sleep disturbances and mood swings.

End Excerpt

My nutritional consultant gave me lots of amino acid/neurotransmitter related supplements, including the tyrosine.

Nov 04, 2013
dopamine estrogen reference
by: Wray

Hi Tanya Thanks for the link. I would agree about the dopamine, it’s such an important neurotransmitter. But I don’t agree with the article about oestrogen. These are all the symptoms usually ascribed to low oestrogen, but I’ve found they are more attributed to low progesterone. Since the 60’s the medical profession have been fixated on oestrogen, little cognisance is taken of falling progesterone levels. So pleased your consultant has given you all those aminos etc, all our complexes have high amounts of them, they are so healing. Take care Wray

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