Out of control

by Aunt Deb
(Brantford ontario, Canada)

I have an 8 year old neice who is out of control. She has low focus levels but extremely high energy. From one minute to the next her attention strays from this to that.

She has serious issues at school because she is disruptive in class and needs total attention. She is very happy and exuberant child but feels the need to negotiate every rule or decision put out by an adult. I feel she is actually learning in school but becomes bored quickly. She is very interested in the opposite sex.

The doctors have tested her for everything going and say she has no syndromes of any kind. She is acting like an adolescent in a young childs body. Recently, I discovered that she actually started her period last November 2009. She is 8 years old now.

What are the possibilities that her issues are caused by hormone imbalance? Can progesterone or lack of it be an issue here? How can we test it?

Comments for Out of control

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Jun 13, 2010
Out of Control
by: Anonymous

Progesterone levels can be tested in the blood or by saliva. You'll want to take the test in the luteal phase of her cycle (The luteal phase of the menstrual cycle begins on Day 14, after ovulation occurs and continues until Day 1 of your next period. Remember, Day 1 is the day your period starts.) I am very deficient in progesterone and believe it was a genetic deficiency. I started my period at 11 and I had symptoms of low progesterone (at the time I did not know what was going on). It affected me for many years. I am now 37 and treating it with natural progesterone. If you can help this child at this young age not suffer - Wow that would be amazing! Kudos to you Aunt :-)

Jun 14, 2010
Out of control
by: Wray

HI Deb The age of puberty is dropping now, it was once 17, but now many girls of 8 or younger are starting, and it's unfortunately being regarded as 'normal'. Much research has been done on this, and one of the glaring facts are the endocrine disruptors in our environment. There are over 90 oestrogen mimics now, in our food, water, air and the skin care we use, please see here. Excess oestrogen has undoubtedly affected your niece. You might like to read the reports below too.
THE FALLING AGE OF PUBERTY
Toxic Chemical Leaches from Popular Baby Bottles
Environmental Working Group
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 March; 109 (3) : 239?244.
Dr Mercola
If a sunscreen is being used on your niece, please be aware these are some of the most toxic products there are, please see here. It would be essential to make sure there are no endocrine disruptors in her immediate vicinity. Please check skin care, sunscreens, food, particularly processed and canned, and drink. If her mother is using an oestrogen cream/gel or her father a testosterone cream, it could be rubbing off on her. There have been cases of precocious puberty occurring in these circumstances. Progesterone will help to regain some balance, as she won't be ovulating yet, so her ovaries will not making any. But they will be making oestrogen and testosterone. If she does start using it, I suggest she tries about 50mg/day to begin with, you'll have to keep watch on the affect, it might not be enough, as technically she's now a 'woman'. For more info on how to use it please see here. Her prolactin levels could be too high as it's stimulated by oestrogen, this suppresses dopamine. A lack of dopamine causes children to lack focus and be disruptive. It might be an idea for her to take the amino acid tyrosine, it's the precursor to dopamine. This suppresses prolactin, as does progesterone. I doubt the doctors thought of checking her hormone levels! More info on prolactin here, and here, and here. Take care Wray

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