I feel terrible!

by Chantel Harp
(Nashville tn)

I'm not sure who to address this to. I am curious who is writing all this information. I feel like I have some solid answers to problems that have plagued me since I started having my period at the age of eleven.
I am a 41 year old female that has Always had an issue with Pms. It has been progressively worse as I have aged. I took bcp's for at least 15 years. I have been through the "bio identical pellet " treatments,that were very expensive and not a lot of good. About 10 years ago I started having irregular bleeding. I was sent in to have an ultrasound and learned I had fibroid tumors. It was a watch and see thing. The pelvic pain was constant. I was referred to a doctor that specialized in fibroids. I told him about my mid cycle depression , constant pelvic, water weight ,migraines,major blood sugar problems,yo yo weight gaining,and just so many problems its hard to even list. He told me that I was too young (37) to have my hormones tested. I knew that I had hormone imbalance. He ended up doing a hysteroscopy and removed one fibroid. There was one that remained. No change. . I still had pain. It was a quality of life issue at 39 and I chose to have a hysterectomy. My surgeon ended up being very difficult. She insisted that I keep my ovaries. I was up in the air on this. My main issue is that I have always felt that the (my ovaries ) have never worked. I deferred to her expertise and kept them. I was had been taking prometrium for a long time but my dr insisted that I stop it and just let my ovaries work. In a very short time I started to have a return of pelvic pain. I had an ultrasound and I had four ovarian cyst. They were not there when I had surgery. I am still having constant pelvic pain,major depression (am on 60mgs of cymbalta,spironolacgone,bydureon,and metformin. I have now been diagnose with type two diabetes. My endocrinologist believes I have pcos. Oh yes I forgot I am also taking liothyronine. I have so many issues my bed side table looks like a pharmacy. I just want to have a good life. I have always felt bad. I have ordered your pcos vitamins and the cream. I am at the end of my rope. I spent half the day crying. I have zero energy. I am praying that these things will change my life. I would appreciate any input in my case. Also who are you?

Chantel Harp

Comments for I feel terrible!

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Sep 23, 2013
I feel terrible!
by: Wray

Hi Chantal I would hesitate a guess you have always had a defective luteal phase, i.e. you have never produced enough progesterone. And that you have always been deficient in vitamin D. That your oestrogen has always been too high, testosterone too, both cause PMS, particularly testosterone. If bound to SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin) testosterone becomes inactive, progesterone raises levels of SHBG, see here, so preventing the rise of free testosterone and severe PMS. That your copper is too high, zinc too low. Oestrogen raise copper, lowers zinc, progesterone does the opposite. Copper can cause depression, anxiety and psychosis. You say you had been taking Prometrium for a long time. Unfortunately oral progesterone is the least effective Delivery system, "The liver and gut region removed a mean of 96 per cent of the progesterone entering these tissues", see here. Too low a level usually exacerbates things, as it stimulates oestrogen. The symptoms are too long to list here, but they are on our Oestrogen Dominance page. The constant pelvic pain sounds more like Endometriosis, than Fibroids. Apparently no one checked for this. And to say you 'might' have PCOS is shocking, surely a test is warranted, particularly with all the symptoms you have. And the other doctor to say you are to young to have your hormones tested is shocking too. I see you must have seen the PCOS page, and realise Insulin Resistance is one symptom. This of course is the forerunner of metabolic syndrome, which in turn can lead to type 2 diabetes. If you had major blood glucose problems that 'too young' doctor should have checked and saved you from going into diabetes. Although he would probably have put you onto Metformin, the stand by of all doctors if blood glucose is a problem. They never check the cause, it's easier to treat a symptom. Inositol is just as effective as Metformin, with no adverse side affects only good, see here. Continued below

Sep 23, 2013
I feel terrible! Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Chantal And the Bydureon increases insulin output, insulin is not what's needed, it's one of the most damaging hormones there are. It is possible to cure type 2 diabetes. Either try the Ketogenic Diet. Or eat only raw foods, see Raw For 30 Days. Please get hold of "Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It" by Gary Taubes, see here. Ignore the title, it's an excellent book which explains the role carbohydrates and insulin play in our body. And how damaging both are when in excess. SHBG drops if sugars are eaten, even those found in all grains, legumes, processed milk and sweet starchy fruits and vegetables. Fructose, sucrose and glucose, reduce SHBG by 80, 50 and 40% respectively, see here. Thereby allowing testosterone to rise. It's best to avoid all the foods and sugars mentioned. Low SHBG is a marker for Insulin Resistance. Wine and beers contain carbs, so it's best to avoid those too. Plus alcohol affects hormone levels in women, see here and here. It decreases progesterone levels and increases androgen levels, both the total testosterone and free testosterone become higher. Sugars and large meals also drop progesterone levels, see here. Plus insulin drops levels too, see here. This means SHBG also drops, testosterone rises, severe PMS can occur, another vicious cycle. And the T3 you're taking, has anyone thought to check your selenium levels? Without selenium T4 cannot be converted to T3. You have a huge amount of Stress, this raises cortisol which slows the thyroid. Excess oestrogen also slows it and more, see here. Continued below

Sep 23, 2013
I feel terrible! Part 3
by: Wray

Hi Chantal You say you have mid-cycle depression, I'm assuming this is when you ovulate? There is an exponential rise of progesterone about 50 hours prior to ovulation. This surge comes from the brain, see here, here, here and here. Oestrogen also rises exponentially about 50 hours prior to ovulation. Unless there is the progesterone surge too, there is nothing to counter the oestrogen effect. This explains why many women get migraines, seizures, palpitations, panic attacks and asthma attacks around ovulation. Please have a vitamin D test before you start the progesterone. Too little reduces the benefits of progesterone, in fact it barely works, see here, here and here. Oestrogen dominance will be worse too when starting the progesterone. You will need at least 400mg/day, probably more, although getting your vitamin D level up generally lessens the amount needed. You might like to see these comments for encouragement, here, here, here and here. In particular this one here. And who am I, please see here. Take care Wray

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