hormones after total hysterectomy

by Angel
(Ohio)

I had a total hysterectomy in Jan. 2011. I had severe endometriosis and couldn't stand the pain. I am 40 yrs. old and have been trying to get my hormones balanced out. I was doing great until Jan. of this year when the endometriosis pain came back. I don't have a uterus, ovaries or anything I thought for it to come back. I guess it was growing on my bladder and such. I had to go way down on my estrogen dosage and go up on my progesterone. My problem is I still don't feel right. I have been on a testosterone injection also because of a none existing sex drive. Now I am always moody, sad, bloated, my feet swell, I just don't feel right. My doc. is wanting me to go off of the testosterone injection but if I do sex will be a chore again. I have an appt. on September 9 I hope he will help me. Is there such a thing as too much progesterone and too little estrogen. I wish I could go on a higher dosage of estrogen but it brings back the endo pain. All my hormones are compounded except the testosterone. I have heard of estrogen dominance is there progesterone dominance also? I tried compounded testosterone but it never helped like the injection. I really don't want to go without having a sex drive. Any suggestions or ideas.

Thanks for reading,
Angel

Comments for hormones after total hysterectomy

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Aug 28, 2013
hormones after total hysterectomy
by: Wray

Hi Angel I've tried helping a few women with Endometriosis and have learnt from them how excruciating the pain is. But as you say, a hyst doesn't always solve the problem, the endo can be found on many areas. I'm startled they gave you oestrogen, knowing you had endo, it exacerbates it. Not only is it an inflammatory hormone, but it's a mitogen and a known cause of worsening endo, see here and here. There are also more papers on the page I've given above. Oestrogen also affects our moods, it stimulates glutamate, our most excitatory neurotransmitter, see here. It destroys beta-endorphin neurons in the brain, these produce endorphins which promote a feeling of well being and relaxation. And it increases free radicals, see here. Whereas progesterone protects against glutamate toxicity, it also increases BDNF (brain-derived neuroptrophic factor) in itself protective, see here and here. If glutamate is too high, it allows calcium, an excitatory mineral, to enter the cells, which just worsens to problem. Progesterone also protects against calcium induced excitotoxicity, see here. It's a very calming, anti-inflammatory hormone. Oestrogen also causes oedema too, see here. I'm puzzled why you want to continue with it. Continued below

Aug 28, 2013
hormones after total hysterectomy Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Angel I don't believe testosterone should ever be given to a woman, see here, here, here, here here, here, here, here and here. It also increases visceral fat, see here and here. There's little evidence testosterone is responsible for increasing Libido, and that applies to men too. Any inflammatory disease, including endo, is caused by oxidative stress. Removing the uterus has not removed the cause, you still have it. I would advise taking high doses of all the potent antioxidants, a list can be found our page about Inflammation. And please have a vitamin D test done, this above all is the most vital nutrient. Take care Wray

Aug 31, 2013
Thanks Wray
by: Angel

Thanks for your post... :-) I agree with a lot of what you are saying but don't we need estrogen to feel normal? Being that estrogen makes our skin look healthy, our bones stronger andmakes us female isn't it important? Also I was on compounded testosterone for about a year with no results. I didn't want anything to do with sex. My life was horrible not to mention my poor hubby. My levels were 4 should have been in the 30's. I was put on the testosterone injection and WOW what a difference. I was had a great libido. So testosterone is needed in my cause and does work. I am off of it for now until I get my hormones tested and see what I need to do to fix me hormonal wise. I am seeing a new doc. in hopes he will know how to treat me without making my endo pain start again. I really don't know much about progesterone and hope it is not making me swollen and gaing all this weight. I used to be a lot thinner now I just keep gaining and feel bloated and swollen. I just wish I could feel like I did before the hysterectomy but without all the extreme pain. I am feeling hopeless right now. Fat and unattractive.

Thanks for reading,
Angel

Sep 01, 2013
Thanks Wray
by: Wray

Hi Angel You are evidently on a very low amount of progesterone, you don't say. But oestrogen causes water retention and weight gain. Using too little progesterone stimulates the oestrogen. There's more info on our pages How to use progesterone cream and Menopause, which you've been thrown into. If you read that libido page I gave you, testosterone does play a role, but minor. In your case it helped, I just advise caution when using it. You need antioxidants as I said, you still have the oxidative stress which caused the endo. Oestrogen doesn't make our skin healthy, progesterone does, see here. And these here and here. If the absorption of old minerals from the bone into the blood stream exceeds the deposition of new minerals then osteoporosis occurs. Osteoblast cells govern the deposition of new bone, while osteoclast cells remove old bone. Osteoblasts are immature bone cells found on the surface of bones. They make a protein which is mainly Type 1 collagen, this forms the matrix into which minerals are deposited. Progesterone and testosterone stimulate osteoblast activity. Osteoclasts cells are responsible for bone resorption, or removing old bone to make place for new. Oestrogen slows down the action of osteoclasts. This leaves us with old bones if there is excess oestrogen, see our page on Osteoporosis. There's more to being female than just oestrogen, although it does play a major role in puberty and the development of the female shape. Progesterone plays a role in our sexual response, see here. This paper and others are on the libido page. These are more papers on bonding and attractiveness related to progesterone levels, see here, here and here. Take care Wray

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