Estrogen dominance

by Helena

I am 39 years old and have virtually every symptom of 'estrogen dominance'. I am also taking an enormous level of calcium supplements (prescribed by my doctor) as I recently suffered with hypocalcemia, and my body seems to really struggle with calcium uptake.This has been a problem for 6 months.

I am chronically fatigued and have constant mild depression, even though I take Venlafaxine which has always relieved my depression in the past. Can low calcium be linked with estrogen dominance? Also, I am petrified of starting the progesterone cream as I am holding this as the answer to my health problems, in the main, and if it doesn't help me I feel I'll have exhausted every avenue. I am pretty desperate and am only managing to work (part-time) because my job is very physically undemanding. I am not a patch on the person I used to be. Thank you for taking the time to read this. Please advise me.

Comments for Estrogen dominance

Click here to add your own comments

Nov 01, 2009
Estrogen dominance at 31 years of age
by: Wray

Hi Helena. I'm concerned you're taking so much calcium and no vitamin D, magnesium and B6. Vitamin D is vital for calcium uptake, so is magnesium and B6. Please have a vitamin D test done, I think this could be your main problem, plus excess oestrogen. Oestrogen causes copper retention, which raises calcium levels. Excess calcium blocks thyroid function, and some adrenal hormones too, and increases insulin production. Check levels. If albumin is low, calcium may appear low when in fact it is physiologically within normal limits. Did they check albumin levels? Hypocalcemia shows up as a parathyroid hormone malfunction, a Vitamin D deficiency, or high or low magnesium levels.

Vitamin D is essential for maintaining normal calcium metabolism, low levels result in hyperparathyroidism, which leads to insulin resistance. 30-50% of people have low vitamin D. Check levels.

Excess insulin suppresses thyroid activity, but excess insulin over a prolonged time causes insulin resistance (IR), this prevents glucose getting into the cells where it?s needed and everything suffers. Some of the symptoms of IR are muscle weakness, tiredness/exhaustion, weight gain, foggy brain, an inability to concentrate, to focus. Low vitamin D leads to depression, so does a disturbed blood sugar.
Please have a vitamin D test done! Levels should be between 50-90ng/ml. For more information please see this website.

If as you say you have virtually every symptom of oestrogen dominance, progesterone certainly warrants a try. But please have a vitamin D test done. You might like to look at this page on insulin resistance. Take care, Wray

Jun 04, 2010
Estrogen Dominance
by: Ric

I've searched the web over... Can't find what the actual numbers for balance are. Example: Estrogen is 30, progesterone should be Estrogen is 80, progesterone should be? Estrogen is 200, progesterone should be? And what should the accompanied testosterone number be? Thanks!

Jun 06, 2010
Estrogen Dominance
by: Wray

Hi Ric Medline is a good place to start, here are their values:

Serum progesterone
Female (pre-ovulation): < 1 ng/mL or 3.18 nmol/L
Female (mid-cycle): 5 to 20 ng/mL or 15.9 ? 63.6 nmolL
Male: < 1 ng/mL or < 3.18 nmol/L
Postmenopausal: < 1 ng/L or < 3.18 nmol/L

1st trimester: 11.2-90.0 ng/mL or 35.6 ? 286.2 nmol/L
2nd trimester: 25.6-89.4 ng/mL or 81.4 ? 284.29 nmol/L
3rd trimester: 48.4-425 ng/mL or 153.9 ? 1351.5 nmol/L

Oestradiol test
Male: 10 - 50 pg/mL or 36.71 ? 183.55 pmol/L
Female (premenopausal): 30 - 400 pg/mL or 110.13 ? 1468.4 pmol/L
Female (postmenopausal): 0 - 30 pg/mL or 0 - 110.13 pmol/L

Male: 300 - 1200 ng/dL or 10.41 ? 41.64 nmol/L
Female: 30 - 95 ng/dL or 1.041 ? 3.297 nmol/L

See here too

Jun 09, 2010
Estrogen Dominance
by: Ric

Thanks for your reply, Wray. I'm aware of standard ranges. Here is my issue...

Progesterone Postmenopausal: < 1 ng/L or < 3.18 nmol/L

Estrogen balance would be off if we only use this number. For example, if estrogen is 30 and progesterone is .5, maybe thats ok. But what if estrogen is 80 or 120 or 240 in a menopausal woman? I doubt that the .5 progesterone value would still be considered a healthy number (even though its in "the range"). There has to be independent ranges but also balance or ratio numbers to make sure the hormones are in sync.

The <1 number for progesterone assumes a postmenopausal woman's estrogen is between 0-30. 0 estrogen and .5 prog might be ok. But what about 30 estrogen and .5 progesterone?

Her postmenopausal estrogen number is 71 (high- way above the range). Her progesterone is .31 (low end). This ratio does not seem right. Estrogen dominance I think. But I can't find anyone who knows ratios, everyone seems to only know the individual ranges.

Thanks for your help, I appreciate it!

Jun 10, 2010
Estrogen Dominance
by: Wray

Hi Ric Sorry! Didn't realise you wanted the ratio. She's way, way off! The ratio varies between 10-100, too big a gap I think, but that's precaution for you. I feel it's best to be nearer the 100 mark, if not over, as I've found too many adverse symptoms still occur in the lower ranges. So her ratio is 0.0043661! To find it you divide the progesterone figure with the oestrogen figure. Although she's post menopause, she's still making oestrogen in her fat cells, however few she might have, we all do. But as her ovaries have stopped functioning they're no longer making progesterone. So you're right, definitely oestrogen dominance and she would certainly benefit from some progesterone. If she decides to try it, please ask here to read this page here. She might also like to read the web page we have on menopause here. Take care Wray

Jun 11, 2010
Thanks Wray!
by: Ric

That ratio (between 10 and 100) is extremely helpful. I came across some math for it before but it was dependent upon how the progesterone was measured (mo, nm or ml or something like that- and can skew the math). But her number was soooo off (like your .004) that I thought I was doing it incorrectly. Currently she is on estradiol 1 mg & medroxyprogesterone 2.5 mg per day. Sounds like nearly a doubling of progesterone is in order. Some progressive doctors say a post-meno woman needs to be at least at 90 (estrogen) to feel good.

I understand that there is an increase of cancer risk associated with raising progesterone/estrogen. I can't seem to find any data on it!

Thanks so much!

Jun 11, 2010
I misspoke
by: Ric

1 ng/L or < 3.18 nmol/L

The difference in these 2 measurements (ng/L and nmol/L) is what threw me off, not nm, ml or mo...

Jun 15, 2010
Thanks Wray!
by: Wray

Hi Ric Glad it was of help. The ng/ml is the American way of measuring hormones etc, called the Conventional Unit. The nmol/L is the way the rest of the world measures them, called the SI or International System of Units. The intials are taken from the French 'Système International d'Unités', who first proposed the metric system. As you seem to like numbers you might find the following site fascinating, I do. Russ Rowlett - University of North Carolina. To find the conversion factors scroll down to 'SI Units for Clinical Data in Medicine'. So the ratio matters not which system you use. And now I can understand why her ratio is way out, MPA is filling her with syntethic progesterone (progestins). Both progestins and oestrogen suppress progesterone. I can't agree with the progressive doctors either. For your mother to get her progesterone level up she would need about 200mg/day initially, reducing as symptoms get better. Yes oestrogen is associated with an increased risk of cancer, it's a mitogen, causing cells to divide and multiply. Progesterone is not, please see here. And please see here for info on HRT. Take care Wray

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Progesterone faq.

Search over 7,500 pages on this site...