Can I use progesterone cream on a child with cerebral palsy?

by Jennifer
(Germany)

Hello Wray,

It is Jennifer again. My mother in Taiwan is still happy with Natpro. For myself, I increased the dosage to 200mg per day, I do not have other symptomes any more, but only slight breasts pain.

Son of my brother was born with cerebral palsy (CP), he is 10 years old now, he can walk but can not run like a normal child.
I read that progesterone cream can help brain injury, but I am not sure if I can tell my brother to apply progesterone on him? Do you know any research on CP in relation to Progesterone cream?

Jennifer

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Jan 27, 2013
Can I use progesterone cream on a child with cerebral palsy
by: Jennifer

Hi Wray,

I just would like to check gently whether you have read my post here? Jennifer

Jan 28, 2013
Can I use progesterone cream on a child with cerebral palsy?
by: Wray

Hi Jennifer I missed it, have no idea why, but I have been having problems with our server. Probably something I did which caused the glitch, as they are so good. Thanks for the gentle reminder! So delighted you're both happy with the Natpro, try rubbing some cream directly on your breasts, this often helps. I have found only four papers which refer to progesterone and cerebral palsy, and in each case it was to prevent pre-term births which seem to be a major cause of it, see here, here, here here. It seems the problems develop in utero, which could be caused by a lack of progesterone, vital for brain development. Or a lack of vitamin D, which is also vital. This is also vital for bone development too, see here, here and here, there were many more. This study here found low levels of vitamin D in all the children with CP that they tested. They used what they call 'high' doses of 1000iu per day for 5 days a week. This is far too low, as you can see from the paper it barely raised the level, from 44 nmol/L to 56nmol/L. Specialists are now recommending levels between 175-250nmol/L. Please ask your brother to have a vitamin D test done on him. I suspect it will be low too. What I find intriguing is the connection between low bone density, low vitamin D status and CP. Many CP patients have epilepsy too. There is evidence this is caused by low vitamin D status in utero. It makes me wonder if the cause of CP is not low vitamin D in utero. A lack of vitamin D reduces the benefits of progesterone too, see here, here and here. We do have a page on Traumatic Brain Injury, to my mind it's certainly worth trying progesterone. No harm will come of using it, and possibly good.
Continued below

Jan 28, 2013
Can I use progesterone cream on a child with cerebral palsy? Part 2
by: Wray

Hi Jennifer The motor neurons are affected in CP. But whether the damage is irreversible I don't know. Progesterone can help motor neurons, it also re-myelinates nerve fibres. An in vitro study found BDNF and GDNF, plus elevated cAMP "have implications for the treatment of motor neuron diseases", see here. Progesterone increases BDNF and cAMP, see here, here, here and here. Vitamin D increases BDNF and GDNF too. I did this page on Progesterone and Vitamin D, I found the synergism intriguing. Progesterone not only helps the brain and spinal cord, but the peripheral nervous system too. It helps with myopathy or muscle weakness, plus relaxing muscles. I know in CP muscles sometimes go into spasm, so could possibly benefit this. It's pointless using low amounts, as you know. As he's 10 I suggest trying 100mg/day, but please do warn your brother about adverse affects occurring when first using it. They didn't with your mother as she was using so much. Incidentally you both might like to read this page here. Another study published by Emory University, showing no signs of toxicity at very high levels of use. For more info on vitamin D levels, test kits etc see the Vitamin D Council, GrassrootsHealth and Birmingham Hospital. Blood levels should be 70-100ng/ml (175-250nmol/L) and not the 30ng/ml (75nmol/L) most labs and doctors regard as adequate. The minimum daily dose should be 5000iu's per day, although recent research indicates it should be 10,000iu's per day, see here. Please keep in touch. Take care Wray

Apr 25, 2013
Can I use progestrone on a child with cerebral palsy
by: Jennifer

Hello Wray,

Thank you for your reply, it took a while to have my brother interested in progesetrone.
My brother is finally considering to try progesterone for his son.

In your reply, you mentioned
"As he's 10 I suggest trying 100mg/day, but please do warn your brother about adverse affects occurring when first using it."
Does it mean, he might possibly get oestrogen dominant symptomes, even through he is a boy?

Thanks
Jennifer


Apr 27, 2013
Can I use progestrone on a child with cerebral palsy
by: Wray

Hi Jennifer I would be so interested in hearing of the result, if any. And yes anyone can get oestrogen dominance symptoms. There are over 100 oestrogen mimics in our environment now, see Our Stolen Future. All foods contain phytoestrogens, even meat. Although grains and legumes have the highest content. If the diet was high in these, albeit they are very weak oestrogens, it would still have an impact. Our skin care contains oestrogen mimics too, particularly sunscreens. No one can avoid it, children are at greatest risk as their immune systems are not fully developed. Plus their small size means if exposed to any, the affect is greater than in an adult. I do hope you're fine too, as I know you were concerned about your high ratio. And I hope your mother is still doing well too. Take care Wray


Apr 29, 2013
Can I use progesterone cream on a child with cerebral palsy?
by: Jennifer

Hello Wray,

Thank you for still remembering my and my mother's situation.
I stop thinking of my high progesterone level as long as I feel painfree in my body.
I found 300 mg a day, can stop my breast sore. however, 2 days before my period, I still have headache.
I also start to use microscope to find out when do I ovulate, so that I know when I can use progesterone. 2 monthes ago I still had full ferning, but this month I did not have full ferning. I read that "full ferning" indicates that body produce high level of oesterogen for ovulation to occur. I am not sure, if it is a good thing for me if I do not have full ferning anymore? Does progesterone reduce my oestrogen? Please help me to understand more on this topic.
My mother is still using progesterone, and still happy with it. I read that at her age, body stop producing oestrogen.
Does she need to use oestrogen cream as well?
Warm regards, Jennifer

May 01, 2013
Can I use progesterone cream on a child with cerebral palsy?
by: Wray

Hi Jennifer I have been concerned and wondered if you'd stopped using it. That's the problem with saliva tests, they can show very high levels, which is alarming. This is why I prefer to go by symptoms, they are always the best guide. Please see our page on Migraines, it might give ideas for the headache. Vitamin D plays a big role, so it could be your level is not high enough. You are right about oestrogen and the ferning, see here. I can't remember how old you are, but the surge of oestrogen would vary in Peri-menopause, and not occur in Menopause. Oestrogen rises exponentially about 50 hours prior to ovulation. Progesterone should too, this surge comes from the brain, see here, here, here and here. Unless there is the progesterone surge too, there is nothing to counter the oestrogen effect. This explains why many women get migraines, seizures, palpitations, panic attacks and asthma attacks around ovulation. The same reasoning can be applied to the symptoms that occur during progesterone withdrawal prior to bleeding. Once progesterone has risen, oestrogen drops, so yes progesterone does reduce oestrogen levels. I'm delighted your mother is still happy with the progesterone. The body stops producing oestradiol as we get older, this is because the ovaries have shut down. But our fat cells continue to make oestrone to the day we die, this is never tested for! Oestrogen is an excitatory, inflammatory hormone, she used to be in pain, probably because she had excess oestrone. By adding oestradiol the pain could well come back. There's more info on our page about HRT. Take care Wray

May 02, 2013
Can I use progesterone cream on a child with cerebral palsy?
by: Jennifer

Hello Wray,

I am 44 years old.
My my oestradiol was only 1,6pg/ml in my saliva test in Dec.2012.
My concern is , will the progesterone reduce my oestragen level out of the mormal range. I mean,if my oestragen might become too low because of progesterone? I heard that sympotoms of low oestragen is more less same as sympotomes of low progesterone.

Warmest,
Jennifer

May 02, 2013
Can I use progesterone cream on a child with cerebral palsy?
by: Wray

Hi Jennifer Thanks for reminding me of your age, it was because of the lack of ferning you had. It could be because you are in the beginning stages of peri-M, and the surge of oestrogen didn't occur that month. I'm still trying to find out what the symptoms of low oestrogen are! People keep telling me they are the same as low progesterone, but I can find no evidence for this. I would be most surprised to in fact, they are very different hormones, which work by opposing each other. Progesterone can best be described by 5 A's.....anxiolytic, analgesic, anaesthetic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. Oestrogen is the reverse of this, it's an excitatory, inflammatory hormone. It is necessary but in very small amounts. There's more info on our Menstruation page. Also on our Hot Flushes page. You might also like to see this article here. And this paper here. These are two others worth reading, see here and here. The researcher questions the amount of oestrogen we have now, and it's implications in the increase in female cancers. Take care Wray

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