38 years old and 2 miscarriages

by Angela
(Texas)

I have a beautiful daughter at age of 24, got pregnant by her father at age 33; found out that was a blighted ovum at 12 weeks. Just recently married and found out I was pregnant at age 38, differnt man, and miscarried at 10 weeks with 45X chromosome abnormality. We are trying to decide if we want to try again. What is the likely hood of me miscarrying again due possible chromosome issues?

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Mar 17, 2013
38 years old and 2 miscarriages
by: Wray

Hi Angela 99% of Turner syndrome (45,X) conceptions are thought to end in spontaneous abortion or stillbirth. 50% of all miscarriages are from chromosome abnormalities, see here. It appears that maternal age has no bearing on the matter. But a previous history of chromosomal miscarriages increases the risk of another. You have a normal daughter, but a blighted ovum is often due to chromosomal abnormalities, although it is normal for it to occur only once, see here and here. To confuse the issue, although maternal age seems to have no bearing on chromosomal abnormalities, age does have a bearing on miscarriages in general. 3% of normal pregnancies end in miscarriages for women under 30 years. Whereas in women 36 years and older, approximately 10% of normal pregnancies end in miscarriages, see here. During cell division or mitosis, the 23 sets of chromosomes replicate identical pairs, the cell then divides into two identical daughter cells, each with 23 pairs. These daughter cells are capable of dividing again. But in sexual reproduction meiosis occurs, in which the sperm or egg (known as gametes) only contain 23 chromosomes each, i.e. only one half of the pair. When fertilisation occurs, the resultant embryo contains 46 chromosomes, one from each parent, forming 23 pairs. But what can occur in the beginning stages of meiosis, is a pair of chromosomes will remain in one cell, and the other will not get it. If one of these faulty cells is present in either gamete, and it should fuse with a gamete of the opposite sex, it will usually abort. Now this is pure speculation on my part, but both Progesterone and Vitamin D are vital to the functioning of cells. Is it possible that the misalignment of the chromosomes are caused by a lack of either of these two? It's certainly worth both of you having a test for vitamin D. Progesterone is more problematic, in men it's produced daily at a steady state. But in women it rises and falls depending on the phase in the monthly cycle. So having a test won't really show much. We do have a page on Pregnancy you could look through, and this one here. Continued below

Mar 17, 2013
38 years old and 2 miscarriages part 2
by: Wray

Hi Angela For more info on vitamin D levels, test kits etc see the Vitamin D Council, GrassrootsHealth and Birmingham Hospital. Blood levels should be 70-100ng/ml (175-250nmol/L) and not the 30ng/ml (75nmol/L) most labs and doctors regard as adequate. The minimum daily dose should be 5000iu's per day, although recent research indicates it should be 10,000iu's per day, see here. It might be an idea to ask your doctor who told you it was a chromosome abnormality, if there the likelihood of another 45,X or other abnormality occurring. Take care Wray

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